Blackberry 7100g vs. Nokia 6800

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The phone also has a very handy built-in calculator application. The Nokia’s is very cumbersome to use compared to the Blackberry’s which is entirely graphical on the screen, similar to the Calculator application in Microsoft Windows. Another nice feature is the daily alarm clock with adjustable snooze, which you can set not to chime on weekends. The Blackberry also has one of the best mobile phone games I’ve ever played, a version of Breakout. When I first got my Nokia I didn’t care that it came with two pathetic games, but the more time I spent standing in lines, waiting at airports, etc. with either nothing to do or too little time to do anything useful, I longed for a decent arcade game on my phone. Sure you can download lots of Java games but that’s too technical for me.

Another great couple of features of the 7100g are its FIPS 140-2 certification, password storage app, and secure wipe feature. It’s kind of cool to think that at a moment’s notice you can securely wipe all data off your handset. The password storage app’s great for securely storing the scores of passwords and other sensitive data you undoubtedly have for various computer systems, web sites, ATM cards, etc. I’ve got over a hundred myself, which I currently keep in a PGP-encrypted spreadsheet. Unfortunately I can’t carry that in my pocket.

One last cool feature for businesspeople is how you charge the battery. The USB cable doubles as a power cable, connecting to a wall plug with interchangeable connectors for different types of outlets. It’s also very lightweight. A final cool feature for world travelers is its quad band operation, one clear advantage over the Nokia (not even the 6820 or 6822 are quad band, however, they both do EDGE data transmission which the Blackberry does not).

A few things are missing though. I got used to my Nokia’s built-in stopwatch and countdown timer, for example. Not essential by any stretch, but handy at times. The Blackberry also lacks infrared, so you can’t beam anything to other people’s handsets, or synchronize without a cable. That goes for Bluetooth too: on the Blackberry, it only works with wireless headsets. There’s also no desktop cradle accessory, so when you need to synchronize you have to lie it flat on your desk connected via USB cable. If you want it to resynch on a schedule, it kind of just sits there, in the way, at an angle that prevents you from seeing the screen. Speaking of the screen, you can set your own wallpaper background, but if you lock the keyboard, it gets covered up with plain white. Dumb.

  • Guignol

    Cool article, thanks for referencing it. To all visitors: it reads better on the original site due to embedded links (some are pretty interesting), and it also looks like it was updated a little after being reprinted here.

    Btw, what’s the scoop on Nokia’s new push email? Is it “just like Blackberry, only different?”

  • Guignol

    Cool article, thanks for referencing it. To all visitors: it reads better on the original site due to embedded links (some are pretty interesting), and it also looks like it was updated a little after being reprinted here.

    Btw, what’s the scoop on Nokia’s new push email? Is it “just like Blackberry, only different?”

  • Guignol

    Cool article, thanks for referencing it. To all visitors: it reads better on the original site due to embedded links (some are pretty interesting), and it also looks like it was updated a little after being reprinted here.

    Btw, what’s the scoop on Nokia’s new push email? Is it “just like Blackberry, only different?”