Weekend Contest ‘Nokia A Threat?’

14 Comments

Mini Bean Bag
This weekend’s contest is entitled ‘Nokia A Threat?’. This week Finnish mobile phone giant Nokia announced that it will acquire San Jose-based Intellisync, a 450-person company that makes e-mail software for mobile devices, in a $430 million cash deal. RIM co-CEO Balsillie, said he is not worried about any direct competition from Nokia as a result of the acquisition. But was that just a move to try to calm RIM investors on the news or was he actually being serious? After all Nokia has already stated that they are trying to target the enterprise market which is dominated by RIM with it’s acquisition of Intellisync and announcement of Nokia’s Business Center. We want to hear your thoughts on what this move from Nokia means for RIM.

This week’s prize is 3 Cellphone bean bags from Spoonsisters that retails for $9.99. To post your thoughts just click ‘comments’ below …

  • Keith

    My opinion and this is coming out of my butt.

    I have used intellisync software for many years all the way back to my palm handhelds.

    I don’t know what enterprise offerings they are providing, but they will very soon be out of the loop when it comes to real deployments of exchange 2003 sp2 and windows mobile 5 cell phone devices. There will be no need to sync or use any third party software, promised by microsoft.

    1. Take Windows Smartphones/ PPC out of their market now.

    Blackberry-

    How hard would it be for blackberry to make their own front end client to serve the same functions as intellsync? They have the money.

    Where does this leave intellisync?

    Nokia! Nokia does not have a real footing in the wireless enterprise arena, i know they offer enterprise proxy products to dilute office documents to internet onto their wap phones, but to appeal to more people, intellsync is a good move for them.

    I don’t see nokia being a huge player in such a saturated field of office wireless data content.

    This really isn’t a roadblock for rim. If microsoft bought intellisync then there would be a slight problem.

    Like i said, this is my opnion, don’t flame me if anything i said above is not true.

    :-)

  • Keith

    My opinion and this is coming out of my butt.

    I have used intellisync software for many years all the way back to my palm handhelds.

    I don’t know what enterprise offerings they are providing, but they will very soon be out of the loop when it comes to real deployments of exchange 2003 sp2 and windows mobile 5 cell phone devices. There will be no need to sync or use any third party software, promised by microsoft.

    1. Take Windows Smartphones/ PPC out of their market now.

    Blackberry-

    How hard would it be for blackberry to make their own front end client to serve the same functions as intellsync? They have the money.

    Where does this leave intellisync?

    Nokia! Nokia does not have a real footing in the wireless enterprise arena, i know they offer enterprise proxy products to dilute office documents to internet onto their wap phones, but to appeal to more people, intellsync is a good move for them.

    I don’t see nokia being a huge player in such a saturated field of office wireless data content.

    This really isn’t a roadblock for rim. If microsoft bought intellisync then there would be a slight problem.

    Like i said, this is my opnion, don’t flame me if anything i said above is not true.

    :-)

  • Keith

    Sorry about that, i thought it was more focused on intellsync and not nokia.

    Nokia has some enterprise offerings but i believe they are missing a killer or distinct device that has been proven to be productive in the mobile workplace.

    example… treo600/650, Blackberries, HTC pocket pc’s.

    I cannot fathom a way for nokia to take any marketshare from either microsoft/palm/good/or rim.

  • Keith

    Sorry about that, i thought it was more focused on intellsync and not nokia.

    Nokia has some enterprise offerings but i believe they are missing a killer or distinct device that has been proven to be productive in the mobile workplace.

    example… treo600/650, Blackberries, HTC pocket pc’s.

    I cannot fathom a way for nokia to take any marketshare from either microsoft/palm/good/or rim.

  • Rich

    You’re indeed right that Balsillie is trying to calm investors but I’m pretty sure he thinks this as a major threat, even if RIM has Blackberry Connect licensing deals with Nokia. It’s like what Apple did with Motorola and the iTunes ROKR phone, Apple diberetly made the phone shitty so it wouldnt eat at their iPod sales. Nokia has no need for Blackberry Connect when they can promote Intellisync and get 100% of the profit.

  • Rich

    You’re indeed right that Balsillie is trying to calm investors but I’m pretty sure he thinks this as a major threat, even if RIM has Blackberry Connect licensing deals with Nokia. It’s like what Apple did with Motorola and the iTunes ROKR phone, Apple diberetly made the phone shitty so it wouldnt eat at their iPod sales. Nokia has no need for Blackberry Connect when they can promote Intellisync and get 100% of the profit.

  • Rob s

    Nokia will undoubtable try to penetrate Rimm’s space in e-mail connectivity but true push technology is Rimm’s forte and anyone who follows these developments knows Ballsllie has covered all the bases.

  • Rob s

    Nokia will undoubtable try to penetrate Rimm’s space in e-mail connectivity but true push technology is Rimm’s forte and anyone who follows these developments knows Ballsllie has covered all the bases.

  • Chris

    I think that the recent case with the patent infringment issues prove who has the superior technology. The fact that the Feds themselves testified in favor of RIM shows that they are satisified with the service they get. Nokia can stumble into this market and produce a fancy phone/PDA, but at the end of the day I would wager that most cooperations and execs have a Blackberry strapped to their belt instead of a Nokia.

  • Chris

    I think that the recent case with the patent infringment issues prove who has the superior technology. The fact that the Feds themselves testified in favor of RIM shows that they are satisified with the service they get. Nokia can stumble into this market and produce a fancy phone/PDA, but at the end of the day I would wager that most cooperations and execs have a Blackberry strapped to their belt instead of a Nokia.

  • http://cwhisonant.blogspot.com/ Chris Whisonant

    I definitely see some threats coming from Nokia. Their new eseries line of phones are amazing. Ther is one “BlackBerry killer” in the lineup and from what I understand they will all have BlackBerry connect (though it’s a little vague).

    As far as the Intellisync acquisition goes, it sounds as if they are buying that up to provide their own desktop synchronization. On top of their sales, RIM will likely continue licensing Intellisync. So that means that Nokia will be providing the desktop synchronization for BlackBerry devices as well.

    I think Nokia is really positioning themselves to make inroads into the enterprise market.

  • http://cwhisonant.blogspot.com Chris Whisonant

    I definitely see some threats coming from Nokia. Their new eseries line of phones are amazing. Ther is one “BlackBerry killer” in the lineup and from what I understand they will all have BlackBerry connect (though it’s a little vague).

    As far as the Intellisync acquisition goes, it sounds as if they are buying that up to provide their own desktop synchronization. On top of their sales, RIM will likely continue licensing Intellisync. So that means that Nokia will be providing the desktop synchronization for BlackBerry devices as well.

    I think Nokia is really positioning themselves to make inroads into the enterprise market.

  • http://www.packetknife.com/ Ali

    This is certainly a major threat. Nokia has divisions that work on carrier equipment, networking equipment (including firewalls), software support, and more. They’re have many more option to optimize their offerings to carriers. Your towers, boxes, chipsets, phones, out-of-box software, phone VPN, etc. etc. all from a one-stop-shop in Nokia.

    The difference being that Blackberry, unlike Nokia, has a ~cult~ following and is already very familiar to Administrators in the corporate world. Furthermore, for them to really start capturing market based on their other offerings integrating well with their new email/office offerings might mean deap-discounting and requiring early upgrades of other infrastructure (on the provider’s part of the deal). Provider’s, at least in the U.S., haven’t been in a big rush to throw out recent investments. So it might take three to five years before Nokia has enough critical mass to provide for enough Fortune 500 companies to really make a serious dent in Blackberry.

    Another thing working against Nokia is that the Blackberry security model is already mature and with S/MIME and upcoming PGP support is getting even more secure. Government and sensitive private industry use don’t lightly change devices and software once they’ve certified and integrated with one platform. That factor alone could keep revenue from old product coming into Blackberry for years to come. All the while reinvesting into new product.

    Unlike some other respondants I think Nokia’s best early chances (years one through three) will be with smaller business and home gadgeteers. Not corporations. Again, moving to Nokia wouldn’t be trivial given recent investments across the Blackberry spectrum (most places just upgraded to BES 4.x, newer devices, etc.).

    But when the time comes Nokia can come to providers and companies with the complete spectrum of product from your hand to the tower and datacenter. That’s something Blackberry can’t do and won’t be able to compete with.

    Blackberry better make some serious friends in Intel’s communications groups soon. Perhaps Qualcomm and others too.

    No imminent danger but in three to five years I could see red marks on Blackberry’s finance sheets due to Nokia. -Ali

  • http://www.packetknife.com Ali

    This is certainly a major threat. Nokia has divisions that work on carrier equipment, networking equipment (including firewalls), software support, and more. They’re have many more option to optimize their offerings to carriers. Your towers, boxes, chipsets, phones, out-of-box software, phone VPN, etc. etc. all from a one-stop-shop in Nokia.

    The difference being that Blackberry, unlike Nokia, has a ~cult~ following and is already very familiar to Administrators in the corporate world. Furthermore, for them to really start capturing market based on their other offerings integrating well with their new email/office offerings might mean deap-discounting and requiring early upgrades of other infrastructure (on the provider’s part of the deal). Provider’s, at least in the U.S., haven’t been in a big rush to throw out recent investments. So it might take three to five years before Nokia has enough critical mass to provide for enough Fortune 500 companies to really make a serious dent in Blackberry.

    Another thing working against Nokia is that the Blackberry security model is already mature and with S/MIME and upcoming PGP support is getting even more secure. Government and sensitive private industry use don’t lightly change devices and software once they’ve certified and integrated with one platform. That factor alone could keep revenue from old product coming into Blackberry for years to come. All the while reinvesting into new product.

    Unlike some other respondants I think Nokia’s best early chances (years one through three) will be with smaller business and home gadgeteers. Not corporations. Again, moving to Nokia wouldn’t be trivial given recent investments across the Blackberry spectrum (most places just upgraded to BES 4.x, newer devices, etc.).

    But when the time comes Nokia can come to providers and companies with the complete spectrum of product from your hand to the tower and datacenter. That’s something Blackberry can’t do and won’t be able to compete with.

    Blackberry better make some serious friends in Intel’s communications groups soon. Perhaps Qualcomm and others too.

    No imminent danger but in three to five years I could see red marks on Blackberry’s finance sheets due to Nokia. -Ali