‘Millions suffer RSI’ from text messaging

Comments

Almost four million Britons suffer from text-related injuries, according to Virgin Mobile. Its report follows recent warnings about BlackBerry Thumb and iPod Finger. Listen to your body, say the experts: numb fingers and aching wrists are a signal to stop. RSI, the symptoms of which include pain and immobility in the joints, nerves and muscles from the fingers to the neck, is caused by repetitive movements and fatigue resulting from natural stresses and strains on the body.

It is frequently found in the workplace, where factors such as inadequate computer set up or repetitive or monotonous work patterns are to blame. Texting is also a cause.


Each year, 3.8m people complain of injuries resulting from text messaging, according to the nationwide survey by Virgin Mobile. Each day, almost 100m texts are sent in the UK – so perhaps it is no surprise that 38 per cent of us suffer from sore wrists and thumbs as a result.

The problem stems from the small size of mobiles. People tend to hold the device in their fingers and press the tiny keys with their thumbs. This reverses the computer keyboard position, where clumsy thumbs are relegated to the space bar and let fingers do the typing.

And while most text messages are short, the survey shows that users make up for this by sending a lot of them: 10 per cent of those surveyed send up to 100 texts a day.

British Chiropractic Association (BCA) spokesperson Dr Matthew Bennett was unsurprised by the findings.

“BCA chiropractors recognise that text messaging regularly, over a long period of time, could cause repetitive strain which may cause both short and long term injuries,” he said.

Dr Bennett expects the problem to worsen unless users take precautions.

“When text messaging, the tendency is to keep your shoulders and upper arms tense,” he explained. “This cuts down the circulation to the forearm, when in fact it needs a greater than normal blood flow to achieve the consistent movements of the thumbs and fingers.”