BlackBerry Hits Hardware Roadblock?

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Continuing right along with QuickPlay Media… CNET is reporting that QuickPlay Media and Sona Mobile (makers of the BlackBerry Media Player) are complaining that the hardware limitations of RIM’s BlackBerrys are preventing them from offering more advance multimedia features.

Christina Biluk, marketing communications manager at QuickPlay Media told CNET.com.au that “hardware limitations” were the primary factor preventing the company from offering video streaming and support for other BlackBerry handhelds.

Shawn Kreloff, managing director of Sona Mobile — whose BlackBerry Media Player does offer video support — also offered similar complaints, saying that RIM’s devices create a “severe limitation from the product and processing standpoint.”

With all due respect to CNET, I think the whole article is rather silly.

I agree that current BlackBerry devices face hardware limitations. Like we reported earlier, the BlackBerry Media Player runs at a paltry 6 frames per second on a BlackBerry 7130 and about 12 frames per on the 8700. However, while we can’t say so with absolute certainty (expect a full review tomorrow), from what we’ve seen of the BlackBerry Media Player on the 8700, 12 fps gets the job done. BlackBerry users do not need high quality video for their news reports and sports updates. Also, if you’ve read the post above, you know that the QuickPlayer works just fine on the 8700.

The CNET article also seems to possess a certain misunderstanding of the BlackBerry 8700 and RIM’s intentions towards a multimedia future. With EDGE support, Intel’s PCA901 processor and a beautiful screen, the BlackBerry 8700 hundred was RIM’s attempt to dip its toe in the mobile multimedia pond — it was never meant to be the whole package right off the bat. RIM’s new multimedia BlackBerry, which is so close to being announced that several sources told BlackBerry Cool they fully expected Mike Lazaridis to pull it out of his pocket during this morning’s keynote speech, is the complete package. With a device of this nature so imminent, it seems silly to pick on RIM for failing to do what they’re about to.