Live from WES: Day 2 Keynote

Comments

2:03 — Wow, I just made it in time for the start of the keynote. So many things to cover here I thought I would be late. Don’t worry, BlackBerry Cool won’t let you down!

It looks like they’ve delayed things slightly to let more people in. Sadly there’s so few people here today in comparison to yesterday’s keynote. I’d say 300 tops.

2:05 – Oh, here we go. They’re starting off with their “Discover. Develop. Deliver.” Marketing spiel again. Once again, we all know why we’re here. Get to the keynote!

2:10 – Oh, here we go. Mike Rhodin, General Manager of Lotus Software is here. He’s talking about the level of interaction between Lotus and BlackBerry users and RIM. Big time self promo… Said email is the driving force behind BlackBerry, but he wants to talk today about the next wave of innovation to push BlackBerry further than ever.

2:11 – A couple of years ago, companies were focused on survival (those who got past the dot com bust). They were interested in profitable growth, not growth for its own sake.

2:14 – Innovation and collaboration are the ways that these companies are gonna drive this profitable growth. Providing a set of tools for people to work better together in this new global world. What are you going to do in this global world to make yourself special and noticed?

2:15 – Innovation and collaboration is about people and our need to communicate and work together. Rhodin is pointing towards the development of the internet as an example of this. But the next step is real-time, portable connection to people. But on these little devices with small screens, you can’t deliver to people all the information you have. You have to prioritize and deliver in context for people to use it.

2:17 – The evolution of productivity: in the 80’s personal productivity (computers, spreadsheets). In the 90’s it’s team productivity (email). But the 90’s had problems: proprietary information, based upon a counterintuitive amalgamation of documents and attachments. Now, information is starting to converge.

2:20 – The information is now going to be delivered openly, and contextually to everyone who needs it, where they need it. He just showed a picture of the standard desktop and how cluttered it is, and how the converged desktop will look like (using Lotus software, of course). But it does look sweet.

2:22 – He’s now talking about new announcements they’ve made this week about sharing information for free of SAP systems (check the RIM/IBM post from earlier today). He’s talking about creating an distribution network for open standards of file formats (cool!). He’s now talking about integrating data into real-time chat applications.

2:25 – He’s look at a five fold penetration increase of their software on the mobile front. Now he himself is talking about IBM/RIM’s joint announcement about improving Lotus Domino for BES users.

 With improved mail/calendar support including encrypted mail and do not forward/copy support
 Increasing support to BlackBerry web services and greater optimization of Lotus Domino/BES performance

2:30 – He’s basically going over the features included in the press release: better integration, better performance, and mobile client access.

Wants to unlock the value of collaboration and ‘social networking’. Wants to build a 2nd generation realtime business platform (which they’re going to ship in a couple of months). What you can do with open realtime networks innovation-wise is incredible.

He’s thanking us and talking about IBM. IBM wants tools openly available over the web to further connectivity and innovation. He’s not transitioned this into an intro for Steven Levitt, author of Freakonomics (good book, check it out!).

2:35 – Talking about how the majority of economists believe a strong foundation in mathematics is key to understand the economy. He’s now telling us how he is the worst mathematician of all time and it somehow hasn’t stopped him from being an economist. He apparently got a 2/5 on his AP Calculus final.

2:37 – He didn’t have the rudiments to succeed in his chosen profession. So he’s tried to make up the gap by doing something completely different. He’s talking about how his mom’s a psychic and being different is okay in his family. Apparently his father became the world’s expert on intestinal gas. This is really funny stuff…

2:40 – The only thing he’s ever been good at or interested in is data. Taking huge chunks of data and making sense of it. He learned from his father that success comes from striking out in areas that no one else is interested in (like do sumo wrestlers cheat, for instance).

2:42 – He’s talking about the co-author of his book (Sadir?) and his college experiment to follow the Greatful Dead for six months and document youth culture as an excuse to get out of class and smoke dope every night. These guys are the original odd couple! Now he’s telling a story about Sadir giving a economic survey to gang members shooting dice in condemned project. The first question was literally: “how does it feel to be poor and black?” It was a multiple choice question… They didn’t like the question and decided to hold them hostage in the stairwell overnight.

2:45 – After Sadir was released, he came back and kept hanging out with them to better understand them. Was eventually named honorary gang member for a day. They were able to get the gang members financial data, came up with some questions, would go back for more data, and ask more questions.

2:50 – They came to some conclusions. The gang organization was no different from that of MacDonald’s (they had a board of directors that ran things). Realized that white suburban kids that wanted to imitate gang members actually wanted to imitate their own parents. This is some zany stuff – now he’s breaking down the financial logistics of making crack.

I’m going to stop blogging his keynote now. I’m sure you really have to be here for this one. But you should go check out his book, Freakonomics, as it follows the same sort of structure as his speech. All WES attendees were given a copy of the book and I can tell you it’s great from what I’ve read.

  • James

    Freakanomics sucked. The book was about in depth as reading the book jacket. In fact reading the back cover summary is all you need to do, the book itself doesn’t actually go into much more detail. And the examples you blogged above are the same as the book. This guy is going on a speaking tour career based on about two pages of content. Amazing! He must be a really talented speaker.

  • James

    Freakanomics sucked. The book was about in depth as reading the book jacket. In fact reading the back cover summary is all you need to do, the book itself doesn’t actually go into much more detail. And the examples you blogged above are the same as the book. This guy is going on a speaking tour career based on about two pages of content. Amazing! He must be a really talented speaker.

  • Aaron

    I saw him on The Daily Show. Meh.

  • Aaron

    I saw him on The Daily Show. Meh.

  • Mike

    :-( I was planning on reading the book but looks like I will refrain. Any suggestions on what I can do with the book now?

  • Mike

    :-( I was planning on reading the book but looks like I will refrain. Any suggestions on what I can do with the book now?