Balsillie ends iBerry rumors… Or does he?

Comments

BalsillieIn what might be sure to crush the hearts of tech geeks and business suits all at once, RIM co-CEO Jim Balsillie dismissed rumors about a potential union with Apple to create the ultimate gadget. Or did he? Balsillie’s comments seem a little vague, so let’s investigate. Here’s what AOL is reporting Balsillie said when questioned about the iBerry:

But RIM must avoid tying itself too closely to one partner, said Balsillie.

“It’s tricky if you get hung up on one thing,” he said in response to a shareholder’s question at the annual meeting.

It seems like our old friend Balsillie is going out of his way not to kill the iBerry rumor, but take it in a new direction. Statements refering to ‘not getting hung up on one thing’ or ‘tying yourself too closely to one partner’ make the razor-sharp minds at BlackBerry Cool think that Balsillie is downplaying the idea of a completely new device designed by both RIM and Apple (which would involve quite a close partnership), and instead favoring the idea of a new consumer BlackBerry (the Stealth, for example) branded with iTunes. This would be a heck of a lot easier to do, and would appeal to RIM’s ‘dip your toes in the water first’ M.O.

What do you think, ladies and gents? Is the rumor over, or has it only just begun?

iberry2headphones

  • Kevin

    Not sure what his true inclinations are, but this “dip the toes” strategy to me seems a half-ass way to go about business. In other words, don’t introduce a fully integrated model to truly judge the success of the product, but rather come out with the same thing that Motorola has done – and arguably failed at. This is a risk-averse (and naturally cheaper) strategy that surely won’t lead to any innovative products nor huge sources of revenue; in my opinion.

  • Kevin

    Not sure what his true inclinations are, but this “dip the toes” strategy to me seems a half-ass way to go about business. In other words, don’t introduce a fully integrated model to truly judge the success of the product, but rather come out with the same thing that Motorola has done – and arguably failed at. This is a risk-averse (and naturally cheaper) strategy that surely won’t lead to any innovative products nor huge sources of revenue; in my opinion.