Are BlackBerrys killing the PC?

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Sad Computer

An interesting article is up on Red Herring about the current state of the PC industry. It points to the recent struggles of three titans within the industry — Microsoft, Dell and Intel — as signs of change. And while the author gives many, many potential reasons for the “end of Wintel,” one of them just happens to be the BlackBerry.

The article’s author points to the fact that “smartphones” like the BlackBerry 7130 have become more networked computers than phones, providing email, instant messaging, and social networking applications — just the kind of thing the average consumer uses a PC for. Looking at the recent hype surrounding T-Mobile’s launch of the SideKick 3, the author also asks when was the last time people lined up to buy a PC.

So, question of the day, folks: are devices like the BlackBerry killing the PC?

  • http://stevenmuncy.com/ steven

    We can only hope that BlackBerrys and other such devices step up a notch so that we can carry one device for most of our communication needs. Being universally connected by cellular, WiFi, bluetooth, or the next big thing is the goal of many of us.

    We each have a core set of documents, information, etc. that takes care of most of our daily items. Bigger projects will require more resources, but those can be left until we get hack to our desks AND have a block of time. For the smaller items, a “note to self”, calander appointment, or return email fills the immediate void.

  • http://stevenmuncy.com steven

    We can only hope that BlackBerrys and other such devices step up a notch so that we can carry one device for most of our communication needs. Being universally connected by cellular, WiFi, bluetooth, or the next big thing is the goal of many of us.

    We each have a core set of documents, information, etc. that takes care of most of our daily items. Bigger projects will require more resources, but those can be left until we get hack to our desks AND have a block of time. For the smaller items, a “note to self”, calander appointment, or return email fills the immediate void.