The Pearl and the workplace

18 Comments

Sounds like a lovely fairy tale, doesn’t it? It might just be one. How many times have you heard the griping and moaning about not being able to use your amazing new Pearl in the workplace because of the camera and such? Confidentiality worries? Please.

We stumbled upon this little piece from ComputerWeekly where they lament about integrating the Pearl (among other devices) into the workplace, and you know what? They’ve found other issues apart from the camera.

Linking new devices to the network, the “new toy syndrome” (‘once one person has one, everyone else wants one, and mobile managers are left either to concede and give it to them or play the role of the bad guy and say, “Nope, sorry pal, we’re not going to support it”‘), and general functionality (the article takes a slight chunk out of the Treo 700w’s ego).

“Many execs are going and picking out a phone, ones with features they like, and bringing them into the company and saying, ‘Make this work,’” said Jack Gold, principal and founder of J. Gold Associates, a research and advisory firm specialising in mobility. “It is getting harder and harder for IT groups to say no, especially to key, high-level execs who pretty much get whatever they want. And they don’t like walking around with the old brick-style BlackBerrys.”

But really, have you folks either experienced issues yet, or do you foresee any issues coming down the turnpike? We’re not really concerned. First things first: the camera. You can disable it. As a matter of fact, all of the cool new multimedia features of the Pearl can be disabled.

This article is actually frustrating to the entire BlackBerryCool staff. We’ve got a feeling that all the flack could be related to laziness on some IT staff (not ours, thankfully – love you, guys) who just don’t want to deal with new devices. But here at BBCool, all devices are innocent until proven guilty, and we can’t wait for some solid evidence showing why ANY device can’t/couldn’t make it to the cubicle.

  • http://stevenmuncy.com/ Steven

    “We’ve got a feeling that all the flack could be related to laziness on some IT staff (not ours, thankfully – love you, guys) who just don’t want to deal with new devices.”

    I think you hit the nail on the head.

  • http://stevenmuncy.com Steven

    “We’ve got a feeling that all the flack could be related to laziness on some IT staff (not ours, thankfully – love you, guys) who just don’t want to deal with new devices.”

    I think you hit the nail on the head.

  • admin

    We literally did today, too, while putting up some great new artwork in our office.

    Thanks, Steven, for the comment. Nice to know our brains are on the right track.

  • admin

    We literally did today, too, while putting up some great new artwork in our office.

    Thanks, Steven, for the comment. Nice to know our brains are on the right track.

  • GrayV

    Can’t agree more – “It doesn’t make much of a difference what it looks like, it has to do what you need it to do.”

    How blinkered? What about style, usability, intuitivity (it’s a word)?

    Would they offer somebody a company car and hand them a Morris Minor? “Sorry Mr Senior Exec, but it does what you need it to do..”

  • GrayV

    Can’t agree more – “It doesn’t make much of a difference what it looks like, it has to do what you need it to do.”

    How blinkered? What about style, usability, intuitivity (it’s a word)?

    Would they offer somebody a company car and hand them a Morris Minor? “Sorry Mr Senior Exec, but it does what you need it to do..”

  • NYC567user

    This response is coming from one of those lazy IT guys…per your comment
    “We’ve got a feeling that all the flack could be related to laziness on some IT staff (not ours, thankfully – love you, guys) who just don’t want to deal with new devices.”

    We love to test new devices…and let the users try them….but you miss the entire picture. There is more to just trying a new toy and saying no/yes because we are playing Xbox over your network in a back room with some other lazy IT guys.

    The article also refers to Treos and other PDA phones..these till now are not up to par.

    For example try to run Blackberry Connect on a PocketPC or Treo and tell me how long the battery lasts compared to a 7290? These non blackberry things are still “geek toys” that require plenty of two hand babysitting. Do you know how many support calls arrive on a weekly basis on complaints of battery problems, stuck keyboards, bad USB connectors, etc.? These units are still built crappy, the reception poor. The irregularity curve on problems on those units are high.
    The Blackberry is still king on not having as many of these issues, it takes a pretty good beating and battery lasts compared to PDA phones such as Treo & Pocket PC.

    From the Company point of view, there is more to just saying “Hey Make This work!”..the easy part is enabling it into the BES…..but the hard part comes when making this compliant with SEC Regulations (try removing T-Mobile IM OTA service books), Legal Company policies, and applications such as Bloomberg or Reuters that beat on the pseudo TCP stack as it pulls market data (some vendor units reboot at this part). Or Reuters for Blackberries that does not run on CDMA ones, thus leaving out your new Verizon 8700 version out in the cold.

    Maybe on a small mom & pop shop of 1000 users that get 300 emails a day such as yours, this “make it work” policy flies and the lasy IT guys..say that…uh..ohm..”no”…but on large corporations of 60,000k++ users getting 1000 emails daily and above there are more issues to deal with that small provincial points of view that many would not be aware.

    Sure we got the Pearl to try and test…but let’s see if it has the same bugs that the 8700g had with RADIO EDGE freezes..etc..etc.
    It took RIM 3 months to fix…did you see that in the news? Noooo.

    We the lazy IT group would love to have Pocket PCs phones with batteries that would last longer than a full work day while using MP3 player, mail, data, and other toys…but to date all the Pocket PC phones tested on various Mail systems and vendors uncluding UK and US just does not complete a full day without batteries dying. Try givng the users a FAT extended battery and see the look on their face.

    Needless to say it is easy to go to the store and get a unit, but later when you crack the screen, or get your unit stolen, lose chargers on the hotel or crack house, etc…this is where approving units comes in handy..because we have spares to replace and parts/acessories to provide. The contracts you need to have in place to have a wireless company commit to the support, or to swap your SIM card within an hour while you are whining in a hotel in Cairo..takes effort and research in the part of the lazy IT team.

  • NYC567user

    This response is coming from one of those lazy IT guys…per your comment
    “We’ve got a feeling that all the flack could be related to laziness on some IT staff (not ours, thankfully – love you, guys) who just don’t want to deal with new devices.”

    We love to test new devices…and let the users try them….but you miss the entire picture. There is more to just trying a new toy and saying no/yes because we are playing Xbox over your network in a back room with some other lazy IT guys.

    The article also refers to Treos and other PDA phones..these till now are not up to par.

    For example try to run Blackberry Connect on a PocketPC or Treo and tell me how long the battery lasts compared to a 7290? These non blackberry things are still “geek toys” that require plenty of two hand babysitting. Do you know how many support calls arrive on a weekly basis on complaints of battery problems, stuck keyboards, bad USB connectors, etc.? These units are still built crappy, the reception poor. The irregularity curve on problems on those units are high.
    The Blackberry is still king on not having as many of these issues, it takes a pretty good beating and battery lasts compared to PDA phones such as Treo & Pocket PC.

    From the Company point of view, there is more to just saying “Hey Make This work!”..the easy part is enabling it into the BES…..but the hard part comes when making this compliant with SEC Regulations (try removing T-Mobile IM OTA service books), Legal Company policies, and applications such as Bloomberg or Reuters that beat on the pseudo TCP stack as it pulls market data (some vendor units reboot at this part). Or Reuters for Blackberries that does not run on CDMA ones, thus leaving out your new Verizon 8700 version out in the cold.

    Maybe on a small mom & pop shop of 1000 users that get 300 emails a day such as yours, this “make it work” policy flies and the lasy IT guys..say that…uh..ohm..”no”…but on large corporations of 60,000k++ users getting 1000 emails daily and above there are more issues to deal with that small provincial points of view that many would not be aware.

    Sure we got the Pearl to try and test…but let’s see if it has the same bugs that the 8700g had with RADIO EDGE freezes..etc..etc.
    It took RIM 3 months to fix…did you see that in the news? Noooo.

    We the lazy IT group would love to have Pocket PCs phones with batteries that would last longer than a full work day while using MP3 player, mail, data, and other toys…but to date all the Pocket PC phones tested on various Mail systems and vendors uncluding UK and US just does not complete a full day without batteries dying. Try givng the users a FAT extended battery and see the look on their face.

    Needless to say it is easy to go to the store and get a unit, but later when you crack the screen, or get your unit stolen, lose chargers on the hotel or crack house, etc…this is where approving units comes in handy..because we have spares to replace and parts/acessories to provide. The contracts you need to have in place to have a wireless company commit to the support, or to swap your SIM card within an hour while you are whining in a hotel in Cairo..takes effort and research in the part of the lazy IT team.

  • Nick

    I am also one of those lazy IT guys. In fact I am the mobile manager at my company. I would just like to say that we cannot support every device that people would rather use. NYC567user hit it right on the button with his response. Thanks for an awesome response and typing what I was thinking.

  • Nick

    I am also one of those lazy IT guys. In fact I am the mobile manager at my company. I would just like to say that we cannot support every device that people would rather use. NYC567user hit it right on the button with his response. Thanks for an awesome response and typing what I was thinking.

  • R.T.

    Amen, brother Nick & NYC567user.

    Shutting the Camera off? SURE you can disable it – when you deploy BES v4.12 that is. It’s been out on Exchange for less than a week, and it won’t be officially out for several weeks on Domino & Groupwise. How many large shops are going to immediately deploy new server code, potentially affecting thousands of users? And how popular a person will you be when you do shut that camera off because of Sarbanes-Oxley, or some other equally restrictive rule?

    Lazy? I am typing this little diatribe on a Sunday at 3:30 am because I’m overloaded managing a large BB shop. If I were any busier, I’d be stroking out from exhaustion…

    Frustrated? How’d you like to be in charge of a 10,000+ strong BB user shop, where every Tom, Dick & Sally has an opinion, wants you to hear that opinion, and if you can’t has a conniption fit.

    Innocent until proven guilty? Yes, devices are as pure as newly fallen snow. Sadly, users are not… It’s never the toolmaker or the tool, it’s how it’s used.

    Evidence? Suretype is a great thing but it’s a radical departure for many users. We’re looking forward to processing all the returns when older BB users can’t get the hang of it.

    Most IT engineering groups love new things and want to deploy them as quickly as possible to as many users. The Pearl is gorgeous – it’s stuff that we love to work on, but most companies see IT as a drain on resources, and as a result IT groups can only support things that contribute to the company’s bottom line.

    Coming up with innovative solutions and working with new technology is what we thrive on and frankly I take offense from Forbes magazine reading dilettantes who say otherwise.

  • R.T.

    Amen, brother Nick & NYC567user.

    Shutting the Camera off? SURE you can disable it – when you deploy BES v4.12 that is. It’s been out on Exchange for less than a week, and it won’t be officially out for several weeks on Domino & Groupwise. How many large shops are going to immediately deploy new server code, potentially affecting thousands of users? And how popular a person will you be when you do shut that camera off because of Sarbanes-Oxley, or some other equally restrictive rule?

    Lazy? I am typing this little diatribe on a Sunday at 3:30 am because I’m overloaded managing a large BB shop. If I were any busier, I’d be stroking out from exhaustion…

    Frustrated? How’d you like to be in charge of a 10,000+ strong BB user shop, where every Tom, Dick & Sally has an opinion, wants you to hear that opinion, and if you can’t has a conniption fit.

    Innocent until proven guilty? Yes, devices are as pure as newly fallen snow. Sadly, users are not… It’s never the toolmaker or the tool, it’s how it’s used.

    Evidence? Suretype is a great thing but it’s a radical departure for many users. We’re looking forward to processing all the returns when older BB users can’t get the hang of it.

    Most IT engineering groups love new things and want to deploy them as quickly as possible to as many users. The Pearl is gorgeous – it’s stuff that we love to work on, but most companies see IT as a drain on resources, and as a result IT groups can only support things that contribute to the company’s bottom line.

    Coming up with innovative solutions and working with new technology is what we thrive on and frankly I take offense from Forbes magazine reading dilettantes who say otherwise.

  • http://www.blackberrycool.com/ Steve St. Pierre

    Obviously the good outweigh the lazy, and I was pretty well aware of that. The ‘laziness’ comment comes from experiencing such, as I’m sure many of the readers have. My apologies if you were offended, but if you are a hardworking IT guy, you should know better than to lump yourself in with them.

  • http://www.blackberrycool.com Steve St. Pierre

    Obviously the good outweigh the lazy, and I was pretty well aware of that. The ‘laziness’ comment comes from experiencing such, as I’m sure many of the readers have. My apologies if you were offended, but if you are a hardworking IT guy, you should know better than to lump yourself in with them.

  • NYC567user

    Who’s writing your blog..the pope? :-)

  • NYC567user

    Who’s writing your blog..the pope? :-)

  • http://www.blackberrycool.com/ Steve St. Pierre

    This is what he does from Monday to Friday. He was pretty adamant about having Sunday’s off.

  • http://www.blackberrycool.com Steve St. Pierre

    This is what he does from Monday to Friday. He was pretty adamant about having Sunday’s off.