T-Mobile introduces Content Lock in UK

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t-mobile-logo.jpgLooks like T-Mobile users in the UK won’t be having that much fun anymore. This is according to a mysterious press release that showed up in our inbox this morning. T-Mobile in the UK will be the first in their neck of the woods to introduce the Content Lock system for adult and illegal content on their T-Mobile devices, BlackBerrys included.

“Content Lock is one of the industry’s most advanced filtering mechanisms to protect consumers, especially children, being exposed to adult and illegal internet content when accessed via t-zones, shortcodes or T-Mobile web-walk browsers. Content Lock specifically blocks access to online child abuse content as well as adult rated sites. Content Lock was launched on 1st December in association with Research In Motion (RIM) and the Internet Watch Foundation (IWF) on all BlackBerry handsets supporting T-Mobile’s web-walk browser.”

I’m just going to go ahead and post the entire press release for you as I’ve yet to see it surface on the web yet. You can check that out below. Thoughts on this content lock, though?

T-Mobile continues to strengthen mobile safety

Content Lock now available to all T-Mobile consumers

T-Mobile becomes the first UK mobile operator to offer Content Lock with BlackBerry internet service
Adult and illegal Content Lock now available on all T-Mobile phones

December 19th 2006, London: T-Mobile UK today announced it is the first UK operator to extend its adult and illegal Content Lock feature to BlackBerry users surfing the web. The service is now available across the board to all T-Mobile’s retail customers and applies to T-Mobile’s complete portfolio of devices.

Content Lock is one of the industry’ss most advanced filtering mechanisms to protect consumers, especially children, being exposed to adult and illegal internet content when accessed via t-zones, shortcodes or T-Mobile web-walk browsers. Content Lock specifically blocks access to online child abuse content as well as adult rated sites. Content Lock was launched on 1st December in association with Research In Motion (RIM) and the Internet Watch Foundation (IWF) on all BlackBerry handsets supporting T-Mobileâ’s web-walk browser.

“As the number of people using the internet and the diversity of content available continues to grow, it is important to implement the necessary precautions to protect customers against illegal content. Extending Content Lock to BlackBerry users demonstrates T-Mobile’s commitment to safeguarding its customers,” commented Peter Robbins, QPM, Chief Executive, Internet Watch Foundation.

Content Lock for BlackBerry devices follows on from the launch of Content Lock on other T-Mobile consumer phones in January 2005. Content Lock applies to 18 rated sexually explicit material (still or moving), gambling and un-moderated chatrooms. Customers trying to access a website or a service on the internet via their mobile phone which is rated as adult content will be informed the site they are accessing has been blocked.

Content Lock is switched on by default for all T-Mobile’s existing and new pre-pay and contract customer accounts. However customers who can prove they are over 18 can ask for the adult Content Lock to be removed free of charge. This is achieved by providing credit card details or an identity check, through customer services, on a dedicated IVR (interactive voice response) on the web or in-store. Illegal child abuse content as defined by the Internet Watch Foundation will always be blocked for T-Mobile consumers irrespective of age verification.

Robyn Durie, Regulatory Counsel for T-Mobile UK said: “We take customer safety and protection very seriously and continue to work closely with all industry bodies to further strengthen the measures we have in place. Content Lock blocks access to illegal internet content and reinforces the protection measures we have in place, providing a safe and secure environment for all our customers.

  • Austin Powers

    What about the right to choose what is on YOUR personal device?
    you paid money you own it why should someone else regulate what content you decide to put on it? I understand for children and such but please someone over the age of 18 can die in a war but cant decide if they want a naked picture of a girl on there cell phone?

  • Austin Powers

    What about the right to choose what is on YOUR personal device?
    you paid money you own it why should someone else regulate what content you decide to put on it? I understand for children and such but please someone over the age of 18 can die in a war but cant decide if they want a naked picture of a girl on there cell phone?