Top 7 mobile and wireless trends for ’07

Comments

oldphone.jpgYear-end lists have been surfacing since early November citing the best records, best movies, and best whatevers for 2006. Computer World’s one-upped year-end lists and looks forward with their article “Top 7 Mobile and Wireless Trends for 2007″ – excited? The article starts right by calling the Pearl a “competent smartphone” and then goes on with the list. They’re extremely thorough with the topic, so hit the jump for the list, and check out the article for their wordsmithing.

1. More mobile access, more competition
2. The era of ‘the big bundle’
3. The democratization of mobile e-mail
4. Search and discovery
5. Mobility gets social
6. Convergence: One phone, many places
7. Media, media, media

Get full details on the list here. And what do you think? What trends are you looking forward to in 2007?

  • L. M. Lloyd

    Can I just point out that if “democratization” were even a real word, it wouldn’t mean what the author of this Computerworld article seems to think it means. Bringing democracy to something doesn’t mean lowering the price point, or it becoming more popular, it means a movement away from an authoritarian system.

    It is truly tangential, but I just see more and more tech stories where the word “democratization” is being used basically as though it means “cool” or “hip” or “really neat.”

    I don’t see anything in this article that says anything about how there has been any change at the carrier level that makes them any less authoritarian than they have been in the past, yet right there at #3 is “The democratization of mobile e-mail” which for his description seems to translate to “mobile e-mail will get popular.”

    Oh, and yes, I know that “democratization” is now in the dictionary, but then so is “irregardless” and “McJob!”

  • L. M. Lloyd

    Can I just point out that if “democratization” were even a real word, it wouldn’t mean what the author of this Computerworld article seems to think it means. Bringing democracy to something doesn’t mean lowering the price point, or it becoming more popular, it means a movement away from an authoritarian system.

    It is truly tangential, but I just see more and more tech stories where the word “democratization” is being used basically as though it means “cool” or “hip” or “really neat.”

    I don’t see anything in this article that says anything about how there has been any change at the carrier level that makes them any less authoritarian than they have been in the past, yet right there at #3 is “The democratization of mobile e-mail” which for his description seems to translate to “mobile e-mail will get popular.”

    Oh, and yes, I know that “democratization” is now in the dictionary, but then so is “irregardless” and “McJob!”