New Bluetooth tech communicates with low-power devices

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WibreeWibree just got its merge on with Bluetooth, meaning that within the next year Bluetooth chips will be able to send and receive information from low-power devices such as watches and heart monitors. Nokia developed the technology to focus on low-power, short-range communications. On its own, Wibree can operate just dandy with small devices, but its new partnership with Bluetooth will allow for dual-mode action, so devices that already have Bluetooth will have more connectivity options to other machines.


In a few years, I can imagine every clock in my house magically syncing up to my BlackBerry, and medical professionals will probably have a field day with Wibree, but outside of that, what other opportunities are there available for this technology? For one, it can change the way push technology works. Just take a look at this slide from their webcast.

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Wireless mice and keyboards are on the plate as Wibree targets, which will likely see some use in mobile. They also list automotive functions – imagine checking your tire pressure through your BlackBerry. Hell, get a full diagnostic software suite in there to help you keep an eye on oil, washer fluid, the whole nine yards. There’s also applications which lie in manufacturing, where communications between lower-power components of larger devices could simply make for more efficient inner-workings. It’ll be interesting to see where this goes, in any case.