Why doesn’t the BlackBerry 8820 have SIP support?

13 Comments

For another perspective on the issue, we asked BES guru and BlackBerry Forums staple, Jibi, what he thought:

To be honest, I’m not sure why the 8×20 devices wouldn’t support SIP protocols. Perhaps it really is carrier-driven (and why wouldn’t it be). The devices were developed with UMA/GAN in mind (read: T-Mobile US), so I’m not sure if SIP became an afterthought or if it will be supported in future OS revisions (I can’t imagine that it’s not supported by the hardware). I’m not really sure if anything is being developed in conjunction with MVS/Ascendent at this point, although I do know the “Enterprise Phone” feature will be standard inclusion for the OS 4.3.x devices and above (perhaps future versions of all OS releases).

Concerning the PBX integration and SIP exclusion, RIM obviously has some agendas, both from business and security angles, so I think you hit it right on the head when you quoted their wanting to do for voice what they’ve been doing for email. Perhaps that’s not the best way to go about it, but if the solution is standard billing for BES 5.0 and if BES is already an integral part of the messaging infrastructure, then their voice integration is either going to flop (due to already established unified communications integrations) or it will be very successful (kind of like people choosing Microsoft products within a Microsoft-based environment due to the nature of the integration of the Microsoft product families).

  • anon

    wow, you guys make some of the wildest assumptions sometimes.

  • anon

    wow, you guys make some of the wildest assumptions sometimes.

  • NDA

    RIM has had a SIP phone for about 2 years. It was part of the 72xx series. It’s the phone companies not coming to terms with the fact they are really just ISP’s in the future.

  • NDA

    RIM has had a SIP phone for about 2 years. It was part of the 72xx series. It’s the phone companies not coming to terms with the fact they are really just ISP’s in the future.

  • cuvillier

    Hi,

    SIP is requested by many customers. Their need is clear, they don’t want to have two phones, they only want one and
    this is logical. Without SIP, you have to buy, to manage, to power, to maintain … two phones.

    You should take this in consideration.

    Regards,

    Philippe~~

  • cuvillier

    Hi,

    SIP is requested by many customers. Their need is clear, they don’t want to have two phones, they only want one and
    this is logical. Without SIP, you have to buy, to manage, to power, to maintain … two phones.

    You should take this in consideration.

    Regards,

    Philippe~~

  • Albert

    I’m confused, I spoke with a RIM staffer and he said the MVS service would work with SIP

  • Albert

    I’m confused, I spoke with a RIM staffer and he said the MVS service would work with SIP

  • jim

    Isn’t it obvious why RIM has not provided SIP??? Think about it. They provide SIP… companies like truphone & fring start supporting the BB… and the wireless carrier looses money.

    You’ll never see a North American company do this. European companies, like Nokia, yes.. but in NA.. never! Not until all parties (handset makers and wireless providers) are assured they will not loose a cent.

  • jim

    Isn’t it obvious why RIM has not provided SIP??? Think about it. They provide SIP… companies like truphone & fring start supporting the BB… and the wireless carrier looses money.

    You’ll never see a North American company do this. European companies, like Nokia, yes.. but in NA.. never! Not until all parties (handset makers and wireless providers) are assured they will not loose a cent.

  • Ben Whitaker

    Jim’s 111% right.

    They’re already two years late providing WiFi on the handset

    Wifi, a separate data channel to the phone – that would be competition for the data traffic recurring revenue part of the handset wouldn’t it?

    We’d put that off as long as possible, wouldn’t we? Why give customers choices when you can railroad them into no choices & divvy up the loot?

    SIP? That’d be competition for the recurring revenue part of the handset, wouldn’t it? E.g. long distance and international calling. We’d put that off as long as possible, wouldn’t we? Why hook up the customer when we can force the customer to buy from the company store and share the loot with the carrier?

    As with most of the mobile scene in USA, the handset makers care a lot more about how the carriers make out than really “styling” the customer with a decent feature set that saves them money and gives them choices.

    The BlackBerry is such a fossil to begin with – their “new super-advanced” model is just now offering 3G about two and a half years late.

    Americans don’t choose their phones. The carriers do.

    Everybody stateside gets their phone from The Sprint Store or the Verizon or T-Mobile store or whatever, from a heavily pruned lineup of loss leaders & longterm revenue maximizers.

    These are not smart purchases, these are simply bait to lure debt-loving Americans to sign up for another long-term debt obligation.

    Money-saving features are the ***LAST*** thing you will ever find at the Company Store, on the Two Year Contract plan.

    I’m an American living overseas and have been making $400 – $500 a month worth of international calls to US cellphones and landlines for free via SIP with a $200 Nokia E70. About $8,000 worth of free calling to date.

    People – a SIP-capable phone is an investment that *pays you *, something that puts *money in your pocket every day* via free calling via SIP. For me about $10 every day that I do not pay to a carrier. I make all the calls, I get all the value, I just do it in a way that means the money stays in my pocket. My phone pays for itself twice every month.

    Your phone, from the Company Store in back home, does not.

    Carriers are scheming how to take as much money as legally possible *out* of your pocket every day. Why would you buy your phone from them?

    I could *buy a car* with the $8,000 SIP has saved me over the last 20 months.

    How much money has your two-year contract with the Company Store saved you? D’ya think they mighta planned it that way?

    Do you even like your phone and service plan that your still probably owe a grand on? Do you still have the option to pay $200 to get out of your contract?

    Prepaid minutes, no contract, SIP, and buying your own phone with your own brain, on the merits, is the way to go.

  • Ben Whitaker

    Jim’s 111% right.

    They’re already two years late providing WiFi on the handset

    Wifi, a separate data channel to the phone – that would be competition for the data traffic recurring revenue part of the handset wouldn’t it?

    We’d put that off as long as possible, wouldn’t we? Why give customers choices when you can railroad them into no choices & divvy up the loot?

    SIP? That’d be competition for the recurring revenue part of the handset, wouldn’t it? E.g. long distance and international calling. We’d put that off as long as possible, wouldn’t we? Why hook up the customer when we can force the customer to buy from the company store and share the loot with the carrier?

    As with most of the mobile scene in USA, the handset makers care a lot more about how the carriers make out than really “styling” the customer with a decent feature set that saves them money and gives them choices.

    The BlackBerry is such a fossil to begin with – their “new super-advanced” model is just now offering 3G about two and a half years late.

    Americans don’t choose their phones. The carriers do.

    Everybody stateside gets their phone from The Sprint Store or the Verizon or T-Mobile store or whatever, from a heavily pruned lineup of loss leaders & longterm revenue maximizers.

    These are not smart purchases, these are simply bait to lure debt-loving Americans to sign up for another long-term debt obligation.

    Money-saving features are the ***LAST*** thing you will ever find at the Company Store, on the Two Year Contract plan.

    I’m an American living overseas and have been making $400 – $500 a month worth of international calls to US cellphones and landlines for free via SIP with a $200 Nokia E70. About $8,000 worth of free calling to date.

    People – a SIP-capable phone is an investment that *pays you *, something that puts *money in your pocket every day* via free calling via SIP. For me about $10 every day that I do not pay to a carrier. I make all the calls, I get all the value, I just do it in a way that means the money stays in my pocket. My phone pays for itself twice every month.

    Your phone, from the Company Store in back home, does not.

    Carriers are scheming how to take as much money as legally possible *out* of your pocket every day. Why would you buy your phone from them?

    I could *buy a car* with the $8,000 SIP has saved me over the last 20 months.

    How much money has your two-year contract with the Company Store saved you? D’ya think they mighta planned it that way?

    Do you even like your phone and service plan that your still probably owe a grand on? Do you still have the option to pay $200 to get out of your contract?

    Prepaid minutes, no contract, SIP, and buying your own phone with your own brain, on the merits, is the way to go.

  • nebula

    You guys are right, RIM does not provide SIP capabilities, but others do! have a look at this:

    http://www.blackberryvoip.com