Weekly Contest: Too much of a good thing?

Comments

BlackBerry 8820With the BlackBerry 8320 coming out on T-Mobile today, it might be time to wonder if any of us should have bothered picking up the 8300 in the first place. It’s been, what, three months and we’re already looking at the Curve like a rotary phone? The BlackBerry 8820 is out, but the 8800 is still relatively new. We talked a bit about our excessive BlackBerry selection a few weeks ago, which looked at the situation in a fairly positive light, but let’s face it: planned obsolescence is good for sales, but doesn’t give end-users much mercy. On the other hand, this new aggressive tempo is making RIM more competitive versus other wireless innovators. So, BBCoolers, for this round of the Weekly Contest we ask you: would you rather RIM keep pumping out new devices at this pace, or should things slow back down to the way they used to be, with just a few BlackBerrys coming out each year? Whoever can best defend or refute RIM’s new strategy will win 3 games from Bplay.

  • Doug Fisher

    I have no problems with the current pace of new devices as long as there are advancements with each new device.

  • Doug Fisher

    I have no problems with the current pace of new devices as long as there are advancements with each new device.

  • edward

    i think they should slow down a little or at least release new berrys at one time with all the features i was pissed that i had to upgrade my 7130e which was and still is a great phone for a 8830 i put it off as long as i could but rim needs to think about those of us who must have the latest phone but dont have the cash to drop every 1-2 monthes

  • edward

    i think they should slow down a little or at least release new berrys at one time with all the features i was pissed that i had to upgrade my 7130e which was and still is a great phone for a 8830 i put it off as long as i could but rim needs to think about those of us who must have the latest phone but dont have the cash to drop every 1-2 monthes

  • Kyle S.

    In short, I believe that the current pace of RIM’s BlackBerry releases is very healthy, mostly from a business perspective but also for end users as well.
    For one, though RIM is a very unique company, many other companies in the mobile phone business advance products at a similar pace. This means RIM can’t get complacent with a single product if there is always a pressure to show marked improvement with each new release. I do applaud them, however, for having such a divergence in their product line currently between the 8800, Pearl, and Curve which all seem to fit different needs and demographics.
    Features-wise, RIM’s aggreessive release schedule makes it hard for people to focus on the drawbacks and limitations of a current product knowing that many of them will be fixed in the next iteration of it. This also helps RIM with one of their biggest aims which is attracting new BlackBerry users. Newbies, especially ones not familiar with sites like BlackBerry Cool or Boy Genius that give them knowledge of upcoming releases far earlier than the phone companies will, aren’t stuck buying something nearly if not a year old with those same limitations.
    Also, BlackBerries as products are not like other electronics such as some computers where only the latest products will function in a way that makes them worth using or having. BlackBerry forums and message boards are still buzzing with people who use 7xxx and 87xx devices and get a lot out of them.
    In terms of improving products overall, the small steps RIM is making now make large steps, like totally new devices, easier and more complete. For example, the Boy Genius’ EDGE vs. Wifi speed test on the 8300 and 8320 hopefully shed some light on wifi’s speed issues which should be fixed in the next BlackBerry release with wifi. Instead of this being an issue for a full year that might not be fixed then, this will only be a problem for a few months as RIM tries to improve. End users might have to grit their teeth as five models instead of two come out over the life of their contract, but that fifth model will beat the heck out of what that second model would have been when it’s time to upgrade as we approach what may be the perfect BlackBerry in the coming years.

  • Kyle S.

    In short, I believe that the current pace of RIM’s BlackBerry releases is very healthy, mostly from a business perspective but also for end users as well.
    For one, though RIM is a very unique company, many other companies in the mobile phone business advance products at a similar pace. This means RIM can’t get complacent with a single product if there is always a pressure to show marked improvement with each new release. I do applaud them, however, for having such a divergence in their product line currently between the 8800, Pearl, and Curve which all seem to fit different needs and demographics.
    Features-wise, RIM’s aggreessive release schedule makes it hard for people to focus on the drawbacks and limitations of a current product knowing that many of them will be fixed in the next iteration of it. This also helps RIM with one of their biggest aims which is attracting new BlackBerry users. Newbies, especially ones not familiar with sites like BlackBerry Cool or Boy Genius that give them knowledge of upcoming releases far earlier than the phone companies will, aren’t stuck buying something nearly if not a year old with those same limitations.
    Also, BlackBerries as products are not like other electronics such as some computers where only the latest products will function in a way that makes them worth using or having. BlackBerry forums and message boards are still buzzing with people who use 7xxx and 87xx devices and get a lot out of them.
    In terms of improving products overall, the small steps RIM is making now make large steps, like totally new devices, easier and more complete. For example, the Boy Genius’ EDGE vs. Wifi speed test on the 8300 and 8320 hopefully shed some light on wifi’s speed issues which should be fixed in the next BlackBerry release with wifi. Instead of this being an issue for a full year that might not be fixed then, this will only be a problem for a few months as RIM tries to improve. End users might have to grit their teeth as five models instead of two come out over the life of their contract, but that fifth model will beat the heck out of what that second model would have been when it’s time to upgrade as we approach what may be the perfect BlackBerry in the coming years.