Monthly Archive for November, 2007

New version of Viigo launched

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Home ScreenIf you’ve been keeping an eye on Pinstack and the beta version of the next Viigo RSS reader, you’ll be happy to hear that it’s ready to rock. For those new to the party, Viigo is BlackBerry app which lets you view categorized feeds for a whole range of different subjects. Additionally, you can add in RSS feeds from any web site which has one. New features in version 2.2.7 include a registration wizard, an optional guided tour to help users find their way around the massive library of channels, visual notifications for unread channels, alerts of feed updates integrated with existing BlackBerry profiles, channel renaming, and an improved channel updating system. One of the cooler upgrades is now you can access your feeds from any BlackBerry or Windows Mobile device, as well as manage feeds on the web using your Viigo log-in info. Awesome upgrade, on the whole. So, uh, why are you still reading this? Go download. Chop-chop.

BlackBerry Cool Podcast: Episode 9

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BBCoolSimon Sage gives a quick update on the week’s news. The spotlight shines squarely on new BlackBerry 9100 info, but we also go over releases in Russia and Singapore, Google’s new My Location, the results of Black Friday sales, and more. Take a listen here! (14 minutes)

BlackBerry 9000 specs leaked

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9000Oh, Boy Genius. What would we do without you? The 9100 will purportedly be carrying a 480 x 320 screen, a 624MHz processor, 1GB of on-board memory, GPS, Wi-Fi, 2 megapixel camera and be running on sweet, sweet 3G HSDPA. Hawt? Yes. You guys who have been clamouring for an all-in-one device? This sounds like it.

At least OS 4.3 will be on there (if not some mysterious new next-gen software), which means video recording and all the other features we’re seeing on recent BlackBerrys will be on the 9100. As for the keypad, you’ve got to wonder where it’s going to go, what with the screen being on par with the iPhone’s resolution. Yeah, there’s a lot of noise about a touchscreen device, but unless RIM has the cajones to say they can do the touchscreen keypad better than Apple, I think a slider format is a much more likely move. If they’re feeling kinky, maybe that roll-out keypad will see the light of day. Camerawise, there’s no upgrade planned, maybe since they stepped down from the Pearl 2′s initial 3.2 megapixels and didn’t want to disappoint again, but there’s still plenty of time for things to change. As for a release date, BG is sticking to his early ’08 forecast, but as ever, that remains in the wonderful and exciting Land of Rumors.

BerryBUDDY to be tweaked for 8120 and 8130

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BerryBuddy 8120Stefano has managed to get an early shot of the new BerryBUDDY for the Pearl 2, which has been adapted for the new USB slot position. Supposedly, the adapter is kind of a booster seat for the 8130 and includes an adhesive pad to keep it in place. That being said, hopefully you’ll be able to pick it up separately for those who have upgraded from the BlackBerry 8100 but still want to use their old charger. We also hear that a Curve cradle is in the works from innov8, but we’ll have more info on that next week.

BlackBerry 8120 hits Singapore

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SingaporeRIM has announced the Wi-Fi Pearl’s landing in Singapore, with all the usual goodies it comes with, available this December. No word on price or carrier yet, but Singapore’s not a big place, so we’re going to guess Singtel will be carrying it, and if it’s anything like the 8820 release, M1 and Starhub could be on board too.

Weekly Contest: Push vs. Pull

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Push versus PullNeil has been on an editorial rampage lately, taking shots at how short-lived push technology will be. As BlackBerry enthusiasts, we’re prone to automatically take push as a good thing, mainly since it’s one of the few bragging rights we can keep over other devices. Neil’s biggest reasons for wailing on push is that, while it’s good now, it’s too much upkeep on the server end of things, becoming a bigger and bigger strain on RIM’s infrastructure. The blackouts this year just go to show the downside of all that traffic. As millions more users come to hammer the hardware for their e-mail and device battery life improves, it will become more viable to query mail servers from handsets, rather than the other way around.

Let’s be fair – BIS users without e-mail forwarding are basically getting pull e-mail, so the BlackBerry isn’t a complete stranger to the horrific idea of having to wait 15 minutes to see if you’ve got anything new in your inbox. It’s just that the instantaneous delivery is what makes your typical twitchy-thumbed BlackBerry user, since they know that if they have mail at any given microsecond, it will be there on their handheld. After spending so long with push, it’s hard to raise a hand against it, but Neil brings up some good points, so this week we’re asking: is push technology a viable long-term approach for BlackBerry? I know, it seems ridiculous to ask, since the two are nearly synonymous, but it’s worth weighting the options. The top three comments which explore why BlackBerrys use push, and best explain the reasons they should or shouldn’t will each get a copy of Ascendo DataVault.

Last week’s winner behind the jump…