Weekly Contest: The Big G

Comments

GoogleYou may have heard that Google will be making an announcement in the next week or two concerning their plans to step into the wireless arena. Needless to say, Google’s a big deal. Since Verizon backed down from protesting the open accessibility of the 700 mhz spectrum, the doors are wide open for Google to drop whatever bomb they want. Now all of tech enthusiasts wait with bated breath for the big move – many doubt that a full-blown Google OS will be involved, but rather suspect a software suite accessible on any platform out there. The possibilities are exciting, that’s for sure. This week we invite you fine readers to get your punditry on: what are we going to see from Google in the next few weeks? The GPhone? Simply porting over what they’ve already made for desktop? What will it all mean for BlackBerry? RIM already plays very nicely with Google; will that work to their advantage, or has it just given the new competition a head start? The one who comments with the most full-bodied, interesting or straight-up wild speculation will get 3 themes from Bplay.

UPDATE: Alright, so the announcement came for Google’s plans for an open platform called Android, which will aim to lower the cost for developing and distributing cellphones. Why isn’t RIM in the alliance?

Lots of entries last week… Honourable mention goes to Timothy for his SOS emergency key idea – blind dates are dangerous, and apparently such a thing already exists! FM radio was another good suggestion, and wouldn’t take much to implement. We’re going to give the win to the other Tim for this one, though. Built-in buddy tracking is a solid service that would be great to have, even if it were just with other BlackBerry users. Keep an eye on your inbox Tim, we’ll be getting in touch with you soon! Thanks to all entrants last week! There were lots of cool pipe dreams that, with any luck, will soon see the light of day.

  • http://pdamobileweb.com/ Tim Nicholson

    I’m not sure I’m going to have the most “full-bodied” answer here, but I’d like to comment briefly on this topic. First, this is what mobile Linux has needed for some time… a group of “heavy hitters” committed to it. An open-source mobile Linux could be the greatest thing since sliced bread, unless it becomes fragmented like the desktop Linux OS’s have. The world needs to unite together to take mobile Linux to the point where it can compete with Microsoft and Symbian (and to a lesser extent, Palm OS).

    It really IS about the OS itself when it comes to competing at this early stage of the game, but having the *applications* will make a big difference in the long-term. Perfect the core and then leverage Google search, Google news, Gmail, Google Maps, Google Calendar, Google Docs (full mobile editing is needed, of course), a mobile version of Picassa and you’ve got yourself something nice.

    So combine a killer OS with killer apps, throw in support for some varied form-factors ranging from a smart RAZR to an expandable iPhone to a mobile Linux-based mini-laptop and you’ve got something intriguing.

    The key here will be support for the one true standard mobile Linux platfrom, open-source (cheap), with good app support, support for widely varied form factors, devout support for 3rd-party application development, and you’ve got a winner.

    If everyone in the mobile Linux space takes the stance, like Palm and others, that they can do it better and keep it proprietary, it will never make a dent in Symbian or Microsoft sales. The world needs to band together and truly build something great and open. Then it will succeed.

    If it takes Google to make it happen, so be it. Red Hat, Ubunto, Palm, PalmSource, etc. probably aren’t going to have the power to do it. Whatever it takes, it needs to happen and its going to require that big-business band together to beat the incumbants.

  • http://pdamobileweb.com/ Tim Nicholson

    I’m not sure I’m going to have the most “full-bodied” answer here, but I’d like to comment briefly on this topic. First, this is what mobile Linux has needed for some time… a group of “heavy hitters” committed to it. An open-source mobile Linux could be the greatest thing since sliced bread, unless it becomes fragmented like the desktop Linux OS’s have. The world needs to unite together to take mobile Linux to the point where it can compete with Microsoft and Symbian (and to a lesser extent, Palm OS).

    It really IS about the OS itself when it comes to competing at this early stage of the game, but having the *applications* will make a big difference in the long-term. Perfect the core and then leverage Google search, Google news, Gmail, Google Maps, Google Calendar, Google Docs (full mobile editing is needed, of course), a mobile version of Picassa and you’ve got yourself something nice.

    So combine a killer OS with killer apps, throw in support for some varied form-factors ranging from a smart RAZR to an expandable iPhone to a mobile Linux-based mini-laptop and you’ve got something intriguing.

    The key here will be support for the one true standard mobile Linux platfrom, open-source (cheap), with good app support, support for widely varied form factors, devout support for 3rd-party application development, and you’ve got a winner.

    If everyone in the mobile Linux space takes the stance, like Palm and others, that they can do it better and keep it proprietary, it will never make a dent in Symbian or Microsoft sales. The world needs to band together and truly build something great and open. Then it will succeed.

    If it takes Google to make it happen, so be it. Red Hat, Ubunto, Palm, PalmSource, etc. probably aren’t going to have the power to do it. Whatever it takes, it needs to happen and its going to require that big-business band together to beat the incumbants.

  • http://pdamobileweb.com Tim Nicholson

    I’m not sure I’m going to have the most “full-bodied” answer here, but I’d like to comment briefly on this topic. First, this is what mobile Linux has needed for some time… a group of “heavy hitters” committed to it. An open-source mobile Linux could be the greatest thing since sliced bread, unless it becomes fragmented like the desktop Linux OS’s have. The world needs to unite together to take mobile Linux to the point where it can compete with Microsoft and Symbian (and to a lesser extent, Palm OS).

    It really IS about the OS itself when it comes to competing at this early stage of the game, but having the *applications* will make a big difference in the long-term. Perfect the core and then leverage Google search, Google news, Gmail, Google Maps, Google Calendar, Google Docs (full mobile editing is needed, of course), a mobile version of Picassa and you’ve got yourself something nice.

    So combine a killer OS with killer apps, throw in support for some varied form-factors ranging from a smart RAZR to an expandable iPhone to a mobile Linux-based mini-laptop and you’ve got something intriguing.

    The key here will be support for the one true standard mobile Linux platfrom, open-source (cheap), with good app support, support for widely varied form factors, devout support for 3rd-party application development, and you’ve got a winner.

    If everyone in the mobile Linux space takes the stance, like Palm and others, that they can do it better and keep it proprietary, it will never make a dent in Symbian or Microsoft sales. The world needs to band together and truly build something great and open. Then it will succeed.

    If it takes Google to make it happen, so be it. Red Hat, Ubunto, Palm, PalmSource, etc. probably aren’t going to have the power to do it. Whatever it takes, it needs to happen and its going to require that big-business band together to beat the incumbants.

  • john

    Google’s Android and OHA is a consortium of major and minor players in the phone software, hardware, and carriers who have come together to build and promote an OS.

    Why would RIM want to help create a generic OS when their own OS is as polished and highly-regarded as it is. RIM has it’s own agenda, Verizon has it’s own agenda, and Motorola has it’s own agenda. The OHA will be rife with argument and poor co-operation.

    RIM doesn’t need Google. Look at the manufacturers that have joined the consortium… HTC, a hardware manufacturer stuck on a slow and inefficient OS. Motorola, A company that is falling apart at it’s seams. Those companies need an OS to save or define them. RIM doesn’t need a savior.

    RIM has invested too much into it’s own OS to show a lack of faith in it.

  • john

    Google’s Android and OHA is a consortium of major and minor players in the phone software, hardware, and carriers who have come together to build and promote an OS.

    Why would RIM want to help create a generic OS when their own OS is as polished and highly-regarded as it is. RIM has it’s own agenda, Verizon has it’s own agenda, and Motorola has it’s own agenda. The OHA will be rife with argument and poor co-operation.

    RIM doesn’t need Google. Look at the manufacturers that have joined the consortium… HTC, a hardware manufacturer stuck on a slow and inefficient OS. Motorola, A company that is falling apart at it’s seams. Those companies need an OS to save or define them. RIM doesn’t need a savior.

    RIM has invested too much into it’s own OS to show a lack of faith in it.

  • jkc

    I completely agree with what john has said. RIM continues to ever evolve their OS making constant improvements on an already good and stable product. They have poured too much time money and effort to go backwards and go into another 3rd party consortium that is starting from scratch to create something of value. RIM already has an OS of great value and to move in a direction backwards from a fully developed to just and idea at this point is nonsensical.

    jkc

  • jkc

    I completely agree with what john has said. RIM continues to ever evolve their OS making constant improvements on an already good and stable product. They have poured too much time money and effort to go backwards and go into another 3rd party consortium that is starting from scratch to create something of value. RIM already has an OS of great value and to move in a direction backwards from a fully developed to just and idea at this point is nonsensical.

    jkc