Wi-LAN sues RIM over tranceiver patents

Comments

GavelOttawa-based company Wi-LAN just opened up a can of legal whoop-ass, dishing out healthy servings to not only RIM but Motorola and UTStarcom. Wi-LAN has patents relating to both CDMA and Wi-Fi, and the ones they’re claiming infringement on are “MultiCode Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum” and “Method and apparatus for multiple access between transceivers in wireless communications using OFDM spread spectrum“. Bit of a mouthful, eh? The two both deal with transcievers and how they decode information, which goes to show how RIM, Motorola and any other manufacturers make for juicy targets for Wi-LAN. As if these guys actually have a “Litigation Update” widget on their site…

  • DavidB

    Patent trolls. Yuk. Hey, Wi-LAN, how about actually produce a product, rather just sue people for a living?

  • DavidB

    Patent trolls. Yuk. Hey, Wi-LAN, how about actually produce a product, rather just sue people for a living?

  • kevin

    Wi-LAN is far from a Patent Troll. Those guys saw something where other people didn’t. They created key aspects of W-OFDM in what is now known as WiMAX. WiMAX is taking off all around the globe to provide high speed wireless data over miles not feet! The person who creates velcro doesn’t have to produce it. He should be rewarded for the invention. Wi-LAN isn’t doing frivolous lawsuits. They have technology patents. Innovation is what makes our technology move forward. Qualicom has made millions on it’s patents. There are trolls out there. I don’t believe Wi-LAN is one of them IMHO.

  • kevin

    Wi-LAN is far from a Patent Troll. Those guys saw something where other people didn’t. They created key aspects of W-OFDM in what is now known as WiMAX. WiMAX is taking off all around the globe to provide high speed wireless data over miles not feet! The person who creates velcro doesn’t have to produce it. He should be rewarded for the invention. Wi-LAN isn’t doing frivolous lawsuits. They have technology patents. Innovation is what makes our technology move forward. Qualicom has made millions on it’s patents. There are trolls out there. I don’t believe Wi-LAN is one of them IMHO.

  • knowsalot

    It always amazes me how people are quick to slam the guy with the idea, from whom the guy with the money to build a factory takes the idea for his own.

  • knowsalot

    It always amazes me how people are quick to slam the guy with the idea, from whom the guy with the money to build a factory takes the idea for his own.

  • GeorgeD

    Re: “Patent trolls” comment… You live by the sword, you die by the sword…

    FACT: Every single company Wi-Lan is engaging relies upon patents as a significant part of their business strategy. A number of large companies in fact generate tremendous amounts of revenue from patent licensing and cross-licensing (Example: IBM generates over $1B in licensing revenue per year).

    Why are patents good for everybody else but not good for Wi-Lan?

    FACT: The term “patent troll” was coined by senior legal counsel at Intel, and imho, in large part as a propaganda tool to make them look like the perpetual victims when it comes to patents. Now every big company, and the uncritical ones that support their practices, uses the term to slam the innovative small guy who just wants his due.

    The fact of the matter is that patent violations are part of the cost of doing business, only the big companies have largely gotten used to ignoring those who can’t afford to take them on, or otherwise buying them outright.

    Wi-Lan deserves its fair due IMHO.

  • GeorgeD

    Re: “Patent trolls” comment… You live by the sword, you die by the sword…

    FACT: Every single company Wi-Lan is engaging relies upon patents as a significant part of their business strategy. A number of large companies in fact generate tremendous amounts of revenue from patent licensing and cross-licensing (Example: IBM generates over $1B in licensing revenue per year).

    Why are patents good for everybody else but not good for Wi-Lan?

    FACT: The term “patent troll” was coined by senior legal counsel at Intel, and imho, in large part as a propaganda tool to make them look like the perpetual victims when it comes to patents. Now every big company, and the uncritical ones that support their practices, uses the term to slam the innovative small guy who just wants his due.

    The fact of the matter is that patent violations are part of the cost of doing business, only the big companies have largely gotten used to ignoring those who can’t afford to take them on, or otherwise buying them outright.

    Wi-Lan deserves its fair due IMHO.