Using Google Insights for Search to Track iPhone, BlackBerry Interest

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Google Insights chart depicting iPhone and BlackBerry interest over time

As bloggers, it’s in our nature to fiddle with the latest and greatest web toys. So you can guess how much time BBCool HQ has spent with Google Insights for Search, the big G’s latest and greatest toy that allows you to view a variety of metrics surrounding different search terms. We thought it would be a good idea to measure the level of interest of “blackberry” vis a vis “iphone”. The results won’t make anyone at RIM sleep easy any time soon.

The numbers on Google Insight graphs reflect how many searches have been done for a particular term, relative to the total number of searches done on Google over time. As you can see from the graph above, in the past 12 months the iPhone has been handing it to BlackBerry in terms of Google search popularity. In addition, the comparative spikes of interest based around recent launches of marquee devices — i.e., the BlackBerry Bold and iPhone 3G — fall hands-down in favor of the iPhone, demonstrating Apple’s ability to run a well-oiled hype machine.

Other items of note?

In the past 12 months, it seems as though Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago have been searching more for BlackBerrys than Canada and the U.S., with Vietnam rounding out the top 5.

Google Insights map of worldwide BlackBerry Interest

Google Insights graph depicting countries most interested in BlackBerry

In contrast, the iPhone generally seems to be a more popular search term everywhere, with Hong Kong, the U.S., Trinidad and Tobago, Switzerland and Singapore comprising the top 5 countries.

Google Insights map depicting worldwide iPhone interest

Google Insights graph of countries most interested in the iPhone

  • http://www.quicklybored.com/ Kyle

    Me gyal dem Patwa pon de BlackBurry?

  • http://www.quicklybored.com Kyle

    Me gyal dem Patwa pon de BlackBurry?

  • DavidB

    I get the whole Google Analytics thing I guess, but REALLY, their data doesn’t mean a lot when you start talking about things like a Blackberry. I mean really, how many people would start looking for “blackberry” at Google, versus just going to blackberry.com? So unless RIM (and the rest of the web) were to outsource their site search to Google (which a LOT of sites do already but by no means do all), the Analytics numbers are never going to be a reflection of reality.

  • DavidB

    I get the whole Google Analytics thing I guess, but REALLY, their data doesn’t mean a lot when you start talking about things like a Blackberry. I mean really, how many people would start looking for “blackberry” at Google, versus just going to blackberry.com? So unless RIM (and the rest of the web) were to outsource their site search to Google (which a LOT of sites do already but by no means do all), the Analytics numbers are never going to be a reflection of reality.

  • DavidB

    Oh, WAIT, all we Blackberry fans need to do is start using Google to perform casual Blackberry searches and we’ll see the Analytics rise in short order! :)

  • DavidB

    Oh, WAIT, all we Blackberry fans need to do is start using Google to perform casual Blackberry searches and we’ll see the Analytics rise in short order! :)

  • DavidB

    Oh, WAIT, all we Blackberry fans need to do is start using Google to perform casual Blackberry searches and we’ll see the Analytics rise in short order! :)

  • http://www.blackberrycool.com/ BlackBerry Cool

    @DavidB,

    I see your point, but conversely, wouldn’t people search for iPhone.com or Apple.com instead of ‘iPhone’ on Google?

    While these stats are by no means conclusive (they don’t even reflect real totals, but percentages of total Google searches), I still think they’re a valuable methods for getting a sense of who is paying attention to what on the Internet.

  • http://www.blackberrycool.com BlackBerry Cool

    @DavidB,

    I see your point, but conversely, wouldn’t people search for iPhone.com or Apple.com instead of ‘iPhone’ on Google?

    While these stats are by no means conclusive (they don’t even reflect real totals, but percentages of total Google searches), I still think they’re a valuable methods for getting a sense of who is paying attention to what on the Internet.