Top 5 Back-to-School Applications for BlackBerry

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The BlackBerry Cool Top Five Back-to-School Applications for BlackBerry

Yep, it’s that time of the year again – bust out the books, call in the loans, and register for classes. Anyone going to college or university has a nice, big, juicy school year ahead of them, and that means it’s time to gear up. Your BlackBerry’s no exception, of course, and can provide plenty of helpful tools to stay on top of your assignments and study for tests. Of course it’s not all work, and there’s a lot your BlackBerry can do to keep you comfortable in the student lifestyle. Here are our top five BlackBerry apps for students heading back into the classroom this fall.

Cram and StudentDocket for BlackBerry

1. Student Starter Pack

The Student Starter Pack is just the extra bit of juice the BlackBerry needs to be seriously geared towards any busy student. The built-in Tasks and Calendar might be able to handle house chores or soccer practice just fine, but StudentDocket melts together task management, contact information and scheduling all into one smoothly-crafted app built specifically for the scholarly life. Cram‘s do-it-yourself quizzing system will make sure you’re always on top of your class material. The two normally cost upwards of $45 together, but they’ve got a $25 deal on until school starts. This bundle came out last week, and won’t be around for much longer – grab it before the end of August!

Facebook for BlackBerry

2. Facebook

School’s just not about hitting the books – it’s also about meeting and keeping in touch with your classmates. If there’s one way to do that, it’s Facebook. The free app lets you get home screen alerts on your BlackBerry whenever you’re poked, messaged, or get a wall post, as well as update status, upload pictures, and look up friends. It’s not quite a full replacement for Facebook’s mobile site, but it’s a good way to get your updates instantly. Just try not to be too distracted during lectures, eh?

  • webconnoisseur

    Personally, I prefer gFlash over Cram. gFlash has different testing modes, tracks the number of cards you have, you can change the view from ‘old-style’ index cards (with the lines) to the modern ‘gFlash’ version (blue background with white letters). Besides already uses the same as template as gRef.
    I like the fact that I could use images on gRef, but the downside is that it’s a live link to view the image (i.e. you upload the image to an image hosting site – flickr, snapfish, etc. – I use vox personally; then you put the link to the image on the template; everytime you look at the reference item that has the image, your phone has to access the link – bottom line: you need an unlimited data plan to access and use images, and you better be in an area with a good reception to upload the image from the link into your phone).
    Overall: good list!

  • webconnoisseur

    Personally, I prefer gFlash over Cram. gFlash has different testing modes, tracks the number of cards you have, you can change the view from ‘old-style’ index cards (with the lines) to the modern ‘gFlash’ version (blue background with white letters). Besides already uses the same as template as gRef.
    I like the fact that I could use images on gRef, but the downside is that it’s a live link to view the image (i.e. you upload the image to an image hosting site – flickr, snapfish, etc. – I use vox personally; then you put the link to the image on the template; everytime you look at the reference item that has the image, your phone has to access the link – bottom line: you need an unlimited data plan to access and use images, and you better be in an area with a good reception to upload the image from the link into your phone).
    Overall: good list!

  • webconnoisseur

    Personally, I prefer gFlash over Cram. gFlash has different testing modes, tracks the number of cards you have, you can change the view from ‘old-style’ index cards (with the lines) to the modern ‘gFlash’ version (blue background with white letters). Besides already uses the same as template as gRef.
    I like the fact that I could use images on gRef, but the downside is that it’s a live link to view the image (i.e. you upload the image to an image hosting site – flickr, snapfish, etc. – I use vox personally; then you put the link to the image on the template; everytime you look at the reference item that has the image, your phone has to access the link – bottom line: you need an unlimited data plan to access and use images, and you better be in an area with a good reception to upload the image from the link into your phone).
    Overall: good list!