Top 5 Back-to-School Applications for BlackBerry

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Brain Up for BlackBerry

3. BrainUp

There’s no reason that keeping your wits sharp has to be a complete drag. Magmic’s BrainUp and BrainUp: Clash of the Sexes both offer a variety of fun, fast-paced puzzles to test a variety of thinking styles, from memory to shape recognition to word manipulation to simple math. IQ Academy also offers the same kinds of challenges in a multiple-choice format. If you’re more the wordy type, Bookworm might be your bag, but Sudoku could just as easily work that problem-solving muscle.

gCalc and gRef for BlackBerry

4. gRef and gCalc!

Both of these free apps are great tools for any student in maths or sciences. gRef lets users create and share customized reference sheets that are quickly reviewable on your BlackBerry. The information can be on just about anything – dog breeds, Chinese, programming, politics, geography, you name it. There’s an extensive searchable catalog where you can see what’s already available. gCalc! is a full-blown graphic calculator application that can handle all the expressions, formulae, conversions, functions and mathematical doohickeys you might need throughout your high school and university career.

  • webconnoisseur

    Personally, I prefer gFlash over Cram. gFlash has different testing modes, tracks the number of cards you have, you can change the view from ‘old-style’ index cards (with the lines) to the modern ‘gFlash’ version (blue background with white letters). Besides already uses the same as template as gRef.
    I like the fact that I could use images on gRef, but the downside is that it’s a live link to view the image (i.e. you upload the image to an image hosting site – flickr, snapfish, etc. – I use vox personally; then you put the link to the image on the template; everytime you look at the reference item that has the image, your phone has to access the link – bottom line: you need an unlimited data plan to access and use images, and you better be in an area with a good reception to upload the image from the link into your phone).
    Overall: good list!

  • webconnoisseur

    Personally, I prefer gFlash over Cram. gFlash has different testing modes, tracks the number of cards you have, you can change the view from ‘old-style’ index cards (with the lines) to the modern ‘gFlash’ version (blue background with white letters). Besides already uses the same as template as gRef.
    I like the fact that I could use images on gRef, but the downside is that it’s a live link to view the image (i.e. you upload the image to an image hosting site – flickr, snapfish, etc. – I use vox personally; then you put the link to the image on the template; everytime you look at the reference item that has the image, your phone has to access the link – bottom line: you need an unlimited data plan to access and use images, and you better be in an area with a good reception to upload the image from the link into your phone).
    Overall: good list!

  • webconnoisseur

    Personally, I prefer gFlash over Cram. gFlash has different testing modes, tracks the number of cards you have, you can change the view from ‘old-style’ index cards (with the lines) to the modern ‘gFlash’ version (blue background with white letters). Besides already uses the same as template as gRef.
    I like the fact that I could use images on gRef, but the downside is that it’s a live link to view the image (i.e. you upload the image to an image hosting site – flickr, snapfish, etc. – I use vox personally; then you put the link to the image on the template; everytime you look at the reference item that has the image, your phone has to access the link – bottom line: you need an unlimited data plan to access and use images, and you better be in an area with a good reception to upload the image from the link into your phone).
    Overall: good list!