Top 5 Back-to-School Applications for BlackBerry

Comments

Dictionary on BlackBerry

5. Collins Cobuild Student’s Dictionary

Collins Cobuild Student’s Dictionary is a solid reference for any student out there. Even budding engineers need to write the odd sentence or two, and it’s important to make sure it’s polished and up to snuff. Literature and creative writing students will have a field day with this one, and may even want to look into picking up a thesaurus (I used the MSDict Concise Oxford for a long time). Language students also have plenty of options – the Oxford Multi-language Pack includes German, French, Italian, Spanish and English translations, all of which are also available separately. Plenty of other languages are out there, so do a quick search.

That’s a far-from-exhaustive list, but they’re our top picks for anyone looking to load out their BlackBerry with everything they’ll need for the school year. Anything that you students out there couldn’t live without on your BlackBerry?

  • webconnoisseur

    Personally, I prefer gFlash over Cram. gFlash has different testing modes, tracks the number of cards you have, you can change the view from ‘old-style’ index cards (with the lines) to the modern ‘gFlash’ version (blue background with white letters). Besides already uses the same as template as gRef.
    I like the fact that I could use images on gRef, but the downside is that it’s a live link to view the image (i.e. you upload the image to an image hosting site – flickr, snapfish, etc. – I use vox personally; then you put the link to the image on the template; everytime you look at the reference item that has the image, your phone has to access the link – bottom line: you need an unlimited data plan to access and use images, and you better be in an area with a good reception to upload the image from the link into your phone).
    Overall: good list!

  • webconnoisseur

    Personally, I prefer gFlash over Cram. gFlash has different testing modes, tracks the number of cards you have, you can change the view from ‘old-style’ index cards (with the lines) to the modern ‘gFlash’ version (blue background with white letters). Besides already uses the same as template as gRef.
    I like the fact that I could use images on gRef, but the downside is that it’s a live link to view the image (i.e. you upload the image to an image hosting site – flickr, snapfish, etc. – I use vox personally; then you put the link to the image on the template; everytime you look at the reference item that has the image, your phone has to access the link – bottom line: you need an unlimited data plan to access and use images, and you better be in an area with a good reception to upload the image from the link into your phone).
    Overall: good list!

  • webconnoisseur

    Personally, I prefer gFlash over Cram. gFlash has different testing modes, tracks the number of cards you have, you can change the view from ‘old-style’ index cards (with the lines) to the modern ‘gFlash’ version (blue background with white letters). Besides already uses the same as template as gRef.
    I like the fact that I could use images on gRef, but the downside is that it’s a live link to view the image (i.e. you upload the image to an image hosting site – flickr, snapfish, etc. – I use vox personally; then you put the link to the image on the template; everytime you look at the reference item that has the image, your phone has to access the link – bottom line: you need an unlimited data plan to access and use images, and you better be in an area with a good reception to upload the image from the link into your phone).
    Overall: good list!