Sorry Mike, the BlackBerry Storm is not a netbook

Comments

CNET Asia’s interview with RIM co-CEO Mike Lazaridis contains a boatload of interesting information about where the head honcho of BlackBerry development feels the industry in moving and where it has been. However, before we get to that, we have to address something that Lazaridis said that is… somewhat weird. Here’s Mr. Lazaridis’ answer to the question of whether he perceives any threats to BlackBerrys from netbooks.

I think I can put Netbooks in here [referring to the BlackBerry Storm]. These are Netbooks. They are just smaller.

Hmmm. Wikipedia (not exactly the last word on anything, but a good place to start) defines the netbook as a light-weight, low-cost, energy-efficient, highly portable laptop suitable for web browsing, email and general purpose applications, usually at a cost of less than $400. While you can certainly purchase a BlackBerry Storm for less than $400, it will come with a carrier contract, something no other netbook features to my knowledge, and that is before taking into account the monthly BlackBerry data and telephony costs. And while the BlackBerry Storm is obviously highly portable, it doesn’t compare well to the ease-of-use offered by a netbook (or any laptop for that matter) for a broad range of functions.

However, I think that the ultimate proof that Mr. Lazaridis is off base with the netbook comparison, is the numerous amount of people I’ve seen carrying both a BlackBerry and a netbook. If you have one already, why carry a second?

UPDATE: Power User Nan Palmero just pointed me to a contract subsidized netbook, but for now this is a niche within a niche (micro-niche?).

|via CNET|

  • DavidB

    I wouldn’t waste a dime of my own money on a netbook, my Blackberry does all I could need when remote from my full-fledged laptop. I think that was his point, that who needs a netbook if they have a Storm?

  • DavidB

    I wouldn’t waste a dime of my own money on a netbook, my Blackberry does all I could need when remote from my full-fledged laptop. I think that was his point, that who needs a netbook if they have a Storm?

  • Colin

    Presumably one important capability of a netbook is to get on the net, and yet most do not offer even an option of having a cellular radio. In that sense, I would agree with Mike Lazaridis that a Storm offers the core capabilities of a netbook but without the name.

  • Colin

    Presumably one important capability of a netbook is to get on the net, and yet most do not offer even an option of having a cellular radio. In that sense, I would agree with Mike Lazaridis that a Storm offers the core capabilities of a netbook but without the name.

  • Hayweed

    Apple on their conference call was asked when they would produce a netbook and they stated that the iphone was a netbook. Rimm just copied this statement in another desperate attempt to keep up with Apple.

  • Hayweed

    Apple on their conference call was asked when they would produce a netbook and they stated that the iphone was a netbook. Rimm just copied this statement in another desperate attempt to keep up with Apple.