Top 3 predictions for BlackBerry and RIM in 3 years

28 Comments

At WES 2009, some of the guys behind the BlackBerry community were asked to present their thoughts on where BlackBerry is going in the next 3 years.

Five of the top BlackBerry Bloggers make their Top 3 BlackBerry Futures predictions at the BoxTone Annual User Conference 2009 co-located with WES 2009 in Orlando, FL on 5-May-09. Hear the great predictions from Al Sacco of CIO.com/MobileWorkHorse, Kyle McInnes of BlackBerryCool.com, Simon Sage of IntoMobile.com, Howie Rapapport of Port3101.org, and Kevin Michaluk of CrackBerry.com.

Al Sacco – CIO.com

1. BlackBerry hardware will become more robust.
2. More BlackBerry device management.
3. Improvement of the BlackBerry user experience.

Kyle McInnes – BlackBerryCool.com

1. Increase in smartphone adoption and lower-end BlackBerry devices.
2. Greater enterprise functionality.
3. Globalization of BlackBerry devices and new foreign markets.

Simon Sage – IntoMobile.com

1. Mass adoption of BlackBerry-based LBS apps.
2. Pay as you go BlackBerry plans.
3 A slider BlackBerry device.

Howie Rapapport – Port3101.org

1. Availability – the ability to properly monitor and scale your environment.
2. Compliance – knowing which apps have been deployed and controlling this system.
3. Convergence – the device will replace your laptop to be your mobile office.

Kevin Michaluk – CrackBerry.com

1. BlackBerry hardware will become faster and more intelligent.
2. RIM eats Palm (potential buyout?)
3. Smartphones, and BlackBerry, will remain a powerful industry.

  • moog

    I find this prediction the most interesting…

    2. RIM eats Palm (potential buyout?)

    Now that Palm might have a competitive smartphone, they could buy the R&D for the WebOS and not spend the time flashing up the BB OS.

    …then again, it could be a complete clusterf*ck

  • moog

    I find this prediction the most interesting…

    2. RIM eats Palm (potential buyout?)

    Now that Palm might have a competitive smartphone, they could buy the R&D for the WebOS and not spend the time flashing up the BB OS.

    …then again, it could be a complete clusterf*ck

  • Matt

    Wow, you guys really like going out on a limb on your predictions.

    Seriously, people. “Smartphones, and BlackBerry, will remain a powerful industry.”? No kidding- doesn’t take an industry insider to scope that one. “Greater enterprise functionality”? It’s their bread and butter- of *course* they’re going to offer greater functionality. What is this, a “How to state the blindingly obvious” contest?

    Here’s a prediction. Within 3 years, the iPhone, Windows Mobile, Android, Nokia, and WebOS will support the latest version of Flash natively on the device, with full hooks into the API. RIM will not support this.

    Here’s another. Adobe will release AIR Mobile, in some fashion, taking advantage of the above integration. Developing apps for smartphones will then require AIR Mobile (or whatever they call it) and one codebase to be deployed on multiple platforms. Except the Blackberry.

    I might be wrong, although I doubt it. But at least I’m not restating the obvious and passing it off as an insider’s view.

  • Matt

    Wow, you guys really like going out on a limb on your predictions.

    Seriously, people. “Smartphones, and BlackBerry, will remain a powerful industry.”? No kidding- doesn’t take an industry insider to scope that one. “Greater enterprise functionality”? It’s their bread and butter- of *course* they’re going to offer greater functionality. What is this, a “How to state the blindingly obvious” contest?

    Here’s a prediction. Within 3 years, the iPhone, Windows Mobile, Android, Nokia, and WebOS will support the latest version of Flash natively on the device, with full hooks into the API. RIM will not support this.

    Here’s another. Adobe will release AIR Mobile, in some fashion, taking advantage of the above integration. Developing apps for smartphones will then require AIR Mobile (or whatever they call it) and one codebase to be deployed on multiple platforms. Except the Blackberry.

    I might be wrong, although I doubt it. But at least I’m not restating the obvious and passing it off as an insider’s view.

  • http://www.regard.com/ Steve Beauregard, REGARD Solut

    Nice additions Matt…However, the dream of “one code base” going across all platforms is a pipe dream! That was what UNIX was going to deliver…then IBM. HP & DEC all came out with there own flavors of UNIX and …surprise…we developers still had to port our code for each…so then we got LINUX…and…guess what…we now multiple flavors again…I see a pattern here!

  • http://www.regard.com Steve Beauregard, REGARD Solution

    Nice additions Matt…However, the dream of “one code base” going across all platforms is a pipe dream! That was what UNIX was going to deliver…then IBM. HP & DEC all came out with there own flavors of UNIX and …surprise…we developers still had to port our code for each…so then we got LINUX…and…guess what…we now multiple flavors again…I see a pattern here!

  • moog

    @Mike You think RIM will pass on flash and air mobile? Based on what? RIM not giving the consumer market focus? Oh, that’s false. BlackBerry not having the horsepower to support flash? Hrmmm…that’s not true either. Your predictions are as baseless as the so-called “experts”. Perhaps more so.

  • moog

    @Mike You think RIM will pass on flash and air mobile? Based on what? RIM not giving the consumer market focus? Oh, that’s false. BlackBerry not having the horsepower to support flash? Hrmmm…that’s not true either. Your predictions are as baseless as the so-called “experts”. Perhaps more so.

  • Matt

    @moog

    Based on the fact that the Blackberry OS is what it is.

    From some informal chats with Adobe software engineers at Adobe Max, Flash on the Blackberry is lagging far, far behind due to the fact that the Blackberry OS is narrowly focused on what it does, and is difficult to work with outside of those areas.

    Also based on the fact that for two years now, Adobe has been pushing Flash to smartphones, and Blackberry hasn’t even hit the “Still working on it- coming soon, maybe” list. Based on the fact that Flash has been shown on several smartphone platforms- not production ready, but functional enough for a demonstration in a keynote address, but Flash-on-Blackberry isn’t even to the point where Adobe is willing to talk about it as being in development. That’s right- when Adobe listed the smartphone platforms they were working with for Flash, Blackberry wasn’t mentioned. Not as a possibility, not as a far-future thing. Not mentioned at all.

    I love my Curve, and will probably be picking up either a Storm or a Tour in the near future. But Blackberry appears to be way, way behind in this area, and I honestly think that within a few years, running Flash on a handset is going to be as expected a feature as GPS and WiFi are now. I really do hope that I’m wrong, but I don’t think that I am.

    @Steve
    Okay- I get wrapped up in my little fishbowl and forget about the world outside it. :) AIR offers a runtime that allows one set of code to run in (almost completely) the same fashion on Windows, Mac OS, and Linux (Most distros). Similar to a JVM. Not *truely* “Write Once, Run Everywhere” I can see the same thing happening in the smartphone world- WinMo, iPhone, WebOS, and Android AIR runtimes allowing code to run on any AIR-enabled smartphone without having to rewrite the app for every platform.

  • Matt

    @moog

    Based on the fact that the Blackberry OS is what it is.

    From some informal chats with Adobe software engineers at Adobe Max, Flash on the Blackberry is lagging far, far behind due to the fact that the Blackberry OS is narrowly focused on what it does, and is difficult to work with outside of those areas.

    Also based on the fact that for two years now, Adobe has been pushing Flash to smartphones, and Blackberry hasn’t even hit the “Still working on it- coming soon, maybe” list. Based on the fact that Flash has been shown on several smartphone platforms- not production ready, but functional enough for a demonstration in a keynote address, but Flash-on-Blackberry isn’t even to the point where Adobe is willing to talk about it as being in development. That’s right- when Adobe listed the smartphone platforms they were working with for Flash, Blackberry wasn’t mentioned. Not as a possibility, not as a far-future thing. Not mentioned at all.

    I love my Curve, and will probably be picking up either a Storm or a Tour in the near future. But Blackberry appears to be way, way behind in this area, and I honestly think that within a few years, running Flash on a handset is going to be as expected a feature as GPS and WiFi are now. I really do hope that I’m wrong, but I don’t think that I am.

    @Steve
    Okay- I get wrapped up in my little fishbowl and forget about the world outside it. :) AIR offers a runtime that allows one set of code to run in (almost completely) the same fashion on Windows, Mac OS, and Linux (Most distros). Similar to a JVM. Not *truely* “Write Once, Run Everywhere” I can see the same thing happening in the smartphone world- WinMo, iPhone, WebOS, and Android AIR runtimes allowing code to run on any AIR-enabled smartphone without having to rewrite the app for every platform.

  • http://twitter.com/BlackBerryCool/statuses/1784365245 BlackBerryCool (BlackBerry Coo

    Top 3 predictions for BlackBerry and RIM in 3 years http://bit.ly/lxOws

  • http://gsoto.com/ gabriel

    These guy are brown noses with their agreeable comments. Blackberry will abandon the storm and end up like motorola after the Q.

  • http://gsoto.com gabriel

    These guy are brown noses with their agreeable comments. Blackberry will abandon the storm and end up like motorola after the Q.

  • http://twitter.com/blkboxstudioz/statuses/1784651393 blkboxstudioz (Tony Million)

    Top 3 predictions for BlackBerry and RIM in 3 years http://bit.ly/lxOws

  • http://www.regard.com/ Steve Beauregard, REGARD Solut

    Matt,

    The problems don’t occur on your everyday run of the mill app that doesn’e integrate with the hardware. The problem is very evident when you want to interface with the hardware (i.e. Place a phone call, take a picture, capture video from the Smartphone). That means Air better have low level drivers to support each function on each OS across all Smartphone models…A very lofty goal…just because the code will run without crashing doesn’t mean the software will perform it’s intended function.
    @REGARDvs

  • http://www.regard.com Steve Beauregard, REGARD Solution

    Matt,

    The problems don’t occur on your everyday run of the mill app that doesn’e integrate with the hardware. The problem is very evident when you want to interface with the hardware (i.e. Place a phone call, take a picture, capture video from the Smartphone). That means Air better have low level drivers to support each function on each OS across all Smartphone models…A very lofty goal…just because the code will run without crashing doesn’t mean the software will perform it’s intended function.
    @REGARDvs

  • http://twitter.com/CoolBBThemes/statuses/1784711066 CoolBBThemes (Jennifer Calandr

    RT @BlackBerryCool:Top 3 predictions for BlackBerry and RIM in 3 years http://bit.ly/lxOws

  • http://twitter.com/pinkmotown/statuses/1784722833 pinkmotown (Paula)

    RT @BlackBerryCool: Top 3 predictions for BlackBerry and RIM in 3 years http://bit.ly/lxOws

  • http://twitter.com/RegardVS/statuses/1785920560 RegardVS (Steve Beauregard)

    Top 3 predictions for BlackBerry and RIM in 3 years http://bit.ly/lxOws (RT @BlackBerryCool )

  • Matt

    @Steve

    A lofty goal, indeed. But think of the payoff.

  • Matt

    @Steve

    A lofty goal, indeed. But think of the payoff.

  • http://twitter.com/cellboy42/statuses/1786892318 cellboy42 (cellboy42)

    RT @BlackBerryCool: Top 3 predictions for BlackBerry and RIM in 3 years http://bit.ly/lxOws