Nexus One and What it Means for BlackBerry and iPhone

39 Comments

Nexus_One

I love competition! There is no doubt that the introduction of the iPhone raised the high water mark for mobile user interface and forced RIM to bring the BlackBerry Storm to market quickly. RIM and Verizon perhaps launched more hastily than they ought to have, but nonetheless the end result was the spawning of the mobile app revolution.

When the software powerhouse Google announced yesterday they are selling the GSM neutral Nexus One Smartphone direct, my initial thought was “I hope they recognize that they just stepped on a landmine!” In my opinion, this is the boldest (no pun intended) move a software company can make. After all, Microsoft has failed repeatedly to successfully make this leap to hardware manufacturer. The nuances of running a hardware manufacturing business is drastically different than writing software and making support tweaks. Furthermore, as I learned when I worked for Digital Equipment Corporation: it doesn’t matter how amazing your product is, you still need to market and sell it.

The Microsoft strategy has been to back the truck up and throw huge quantities of cash to solve these problems. Well, I think we all see how well that has worked for them. In order to be successful, Google better be well prepared or the darlings of Sand Hill Road will fall flat on their faces!

The first hurdle for Google will be to convince Motorola, HTC and other (now) third party manufacturers that this won’t impact them. Yeah right. How will Google create a level playing field in this hotly competitive and congested market?

Secondly, by releasing Nexus One as a GSM unlocked Smartphone and selling direct, Google thumbs both nostrils at the carriers. When I look at business plans for REGARD Venture Solutions, one of the primary things I look for is “cost of sales.” Will the business require a huge sales force traveling around the country or world to evangelize the product?

As a mobile software vendor, I have been invited into countless enterprise carrier sales meetings to introduce REGARD Solutions. These carrier sales forces are strictly “coin operated.” It is nearly impossible to get mindshare of these teams unless they smell easy money. If they do, they will go sell the hell out of it! The carriers’ questions are always related to differentiation. Having a gadget that the other carrier doesn’t gives them a reason to call clients and sell.

On the retail side, Google will have to contend with storefront marketing, retail sales teams (also coin operated) and the “pants dropping” device discount game. As I learned when REGARD was in the device business, it is really hard to sell against “Free”.

By foregoing much of the sales and marketing muscle of the carriers, Google better have conspired with Count Dooku to build up a sales army of Clone Troopers that will get out there and push the product. Underestimating the convincing power of the carrier direct sales teams is among the mistakes Sierra Wireless made when the “GSM neutral” Voq Smartphone flopped in 2004.

For Nexus One to be successful, the go-to-market strategy will have to be one of differentiation and distribution through either well established carrier channels or they will have to revolutionize the distribution model as DELL did with a direct only sales model and killing everyone else on price. Presently, it looks as if they are doing neither.

As for how the release of Nexus One impacts BlackBerry and iPhone? Until Google addresses the issues above, there will be no impact except slight cannibalization of their third party Android sales. Apple and BlackBerry have provided plenty of “Kool Aid” to their faithful and Google will learn It takes a lot more than building a better mouse trap (not that it is). They still need to market and sell it!

Nonetheless, Nexus One looks amazing and, just in case everything I said above proves to be flat out wrong, I am ordering one today for my Android development team.

  • http://hamleshmotah.com/ Hamlesh

    But Google aren’t making the hardware… HTC is, and they have lots of experience doing so, and working with Android.

  • http://hamleshmotah.com Hamlesh

    But Google aren’t making the hardware… HTC is, and they have lots of experience doing so, and working with Android.

  • K Dub

    I’m pretty positive that Google said they would not make any hardware, and they still haven’t. HTC manufactured the phone and Google worked with them directly. I hope you correct this article.

  • K Dub

    I’m pretty positive that Google said they would not make any hardware, and they still haven’t. HTC manufactured the phone and Google worked with them directly. I hope you correct this article.

  • Richard K

    You paint a plausible scenario. However, I think Google is copying much of what Apple did. You probably won’t disagree with the thought that the iPhone’s success has little to do with the skills and dedication of AT&T’s salesforce. What did it for the iPhone were an excellent hardware/software platform from a “cool” brand that is hyper-friendly to developers. Google expects to take this one notch higher. I think that Google meddled with hardware design because they saw that handset manufacturers — Motorola, Nokia, Samsung, HTC et al — are not very good at creating a superb user experience. Again, from Apple’s playbook.

    Regarding BlackBerry, they better have an amazing OS improvement in the works or they’ll slowly disappear as those two-year contracts come up for renewal. I’m a BB Storm user and I can’t fathom OS5 as I know it today being the platform that will compete with the iPhone or Android.

  • Richard K

    You paint a plausible scenario. However, I think Google is copying much of what Apple did. You probably won’t disagree with the thought that the iPhone’s success has little to do with the skills and dedication of AT&T’s salesforce. What did it for the iPhone were an excellent hardware/software platform from a “cool” brand that is hyper-friendly to developers. Google expects to take this one notch higher. I think that Google meddled with hardware design because they saw that handset manufacturers — Motorola, Nokia, Samsung, HTC et al — are not very good at creating a superb user experience. Again, from Apple’s playbook.

    Regarding BlackBerry, they better have an amazing OS improvement in the works or they’ll slowly disappear as those two-year contracts come up for renewal. I’m a BB Storm user and I can’t fathom OS5 as I know it today being the platform that will compete with the iPhone or Android.

  • Sr

    I agree, HTC is making the hardware, not Google…and how will making a best selling phone negatively impact HTC? Sure, it might impact sales for other HTC phones, but that is just product shift (assuming the N1 has a similar margin). As for Google, the entire argument rests on the notion that Google is looking to make money on the Nexus. Google makes all their money on advertising, and mobile ad revenue is growing exponentially, so what better way to capitalize on that trend then to put “Google” in the pocket of every consumer. Its the same reason they give all their online products away for free. I was actually surprised at the phone’s high price tag, but I suppose it makes sense for an untested initial release. But if Google sees significant incremental ad revenue coming from the N1, you can probably expect a Google subsidized price in the future.

  • Sr

    I agree, HTC is making the hardware, not Google…and how will making a best selling phone negatively impact HTC? Sure, it might impact sales for other HTC phones, but that is just product shift (assuming the N1 has a similar margin). As for Google, the entire argument rests on the notion that Google is looking to make money on the Nexus. Google makes all their money on advertising, and mobile ad revenue is growing exponentially, so what better way to capitalize on that trend then to put “Google” in the pocket of every consumer. Its the same reason they give all their online products away for free. I was actually surprised at the phone’s high price tag, but I suppose it makes sense for an untested initial release. But if Google sees significant incremental ad revenue coming from the N1, you can probably expect a Google subsidized price in the future.

  • RyanMacG

    It is also worth noting that there are subsidized rates for the US through T-Mobile now and soon through Verizon and this will be repeated with Vodafone in Europe. Google are taking steps to provide a phone that people want and it’s making me consider dropping the Storm like the horrible brick it is…especially with Vodafone delaying the release of OS 5.0 in the UK

  • RyanMacG

    It is also worth noting that there are subsidized rates for the US through T-Mobile now and soon through Verizon and this will be repeated with Vodafone in Europe. Google are taking steps to provide a phone that people want and it’s making me consider dropping the Storm like the horrible brick it is…especially with Vodafone delaying the release of OS 5.0 in the UK

  • AT

    I would say you should probably do a little more research before you write an article like this.

    As for me, I think the N1 will take away a few sales from both the iphone and blackberry, but not enough to make it hugely noticeable for a single company. All four companies (using Google and Microsoft as the android or Windows whole, not HTC or Motorola, etc…) are very useful for different groups. All have a very strong presence and none will go down anytime soon.

  • AT

    I would say you should probably do a little more research before you write an article like this.

    As for me, I think the N1 will take away a few sales from both the iphone and blackberry, but not enough to make it hugely noticeable for a single company. All four companies (using Google and Microsoft as the android or Windows whole, not HTC or Motorola, etc…) are very useful for different groups. All have a very strong presence and none will go down anytime soon.

  • ShaynePierce

    Keep in mind that Google makes most (if not all) their money from being the data exchangers. Knowing directly where people go, what searches they make, what numbers they dial, what pictures they load, what songs they play, etc, etc, etc, will make them the most money. Controlling data is and always will be their big money maker.

  • ShaynePierce

    Keep in mind that Google makes most (if not all) their money from being the data exchangers. Knowing directly where people go, what searches they make, what numbers they dial, what pictures they load, what songs they play, etc, etc, etc, will make them the most money. Controlling data is and always will be their big money maker.

  • John McHammond

    IMHO applications are the next battleground in the war for consumer “superphone” (I hope that doesn’t stick) market share, and how each manufacturer attracts and supports their developer community will be crucial.

    The biggest blow that comes with the Nexus One to BlackBerry is in developer mind share. There are 40-50 Million BlackBerry’s in market today (ish, or soon), and 80% of their last quarters sales were to consumers – so on the surface, this seems like a no-brainer platform for a developer to focus on. So why the slow uptake with BlackBerry applications?

    1. BlackBerry developer tools, while slowing getting better, are atrocious. One comment from a friend of mine, within the first 24 hours of using RIM’s developer tools was “this company will lose because of this”. Go try for yourself, I guarantee you will give up within the first week.

    2. Their OS is antiquated, and remains largely unchanged since OS 4.1/4.2. That’s 3-4 years people! Written when email ruled, twitter hadn’t been born, and browsing the web from a mobile device was still very star-trek. 7-10% of users in 2007 tried their browser on their phone – today, its north of 70% of smartphone users do (in large part, thanks to the iPhone).

    So, given all of that above, with all the sex-appeal and hype of iPhone and Android today, and their comparatively dreamy O/S and developer tools – what platform would you choose to build software for?

    RIM is already walking a slippery slope with developers. The Nexus One announcement only further pushes the BlackBerry Platform into obscurity in the eyes of the developer community.

    I would hazard a guess that this is a well known fact within the halls in Waterloo, and you wouldn’t find a more motivated, intelligent group of folks all (hopefully) working to solve this issue.

    Too little too late? Only time will tell.

  • John McHammond

    IMHO applications are the next battleground in the war for consumer “superphone” (I hope that doesn’t stick) market share, and how each manufacturer attracts and supports their developer community will be crucial.

    The biggest blow that comes with the Nexus One to BlackBerry is in developer mind share. There are 40-50 Million BlackBerry’s in market today (ish, or soon), and 80% of their last quarters sales were to consumers – so on the surface, this seems like a no-brainer platform for a developer to focus on. So why the slow uptake with BlackBerry applications?

    1. BlackBerry developer tools, while slowing getting better, are atrocious. One comment from a friend of mine, within the first 24 hours of using RIM’s developer tools was “this company will lose because of this”. Go try for yourself, I guarantee you will give up within the first week.

    2. Their OS is antiquated, and remains largely unchanged since OS 4.1/4.2. That’s 3-4 years people! Written when email ruled, twitter hadn’t been born, and browsing the web from a mobile device was still very star-trek. 7-10% of users in 2007 tried their browser on their phone – today, its north of 70% of smartphone users do (in large part, thanks to the iPhone).

    So, given all of that above, with all the sex-appeal and hype of iPhone and Android today, and their comparatively dreamy O/S and developer tools – what platform would you choose to build software for?

    RIM is already walking a slippery slope with developers. The Nexus One announcement only further pushes the BlackBerry Platform into obscurity in the eyes of the developer community.

    I would hazard a guess that this is a well known fact within the halls in Waterloo, and you wouldn’t find a more motivated, intelligent group of folks all (hopefully) working to solve this issue.

    Too little too late? Only time will tell.

  • MadderFragger

    This article is a somewhat lame. First of all, as everyone else pointed out Google is NOT manufacturing the phones. So for Steve “Lame” to write “The nuances of running a hardware manufacturing business is drastically different than writing software and making support tweaks.” is such a lame statement.
    Needless to say, this article should have been edited by “editors” from editorials.

    Google doesn’t have to hard sell any product be it software, hardware, or vaporware. People will buy it! They don’t need travelling salesmen, their products travel. Oh, have you heard of this thing called the “Internet”?
    Steve apparently still thinks along the lines of 20th century pre-internet age. Or should I say, pre-Google age.

    Cynics, you need to watch and learn from Google.

  • MadderFragger

    This article is a somewhat lame. First of all, as everyone else pointed out Google is NOT manufacturing the phones. So for Steve “Lame” to write “The nuances of running a hardware manufacturing business is drastically different than writing software and making support tweaks.” is such a lame statement.
    Needless to say, this article should have been edited by “editors” from editorials.

    Google doesn’t have to hard sell any product be it software, hardware, or vaporware. People will buy it! They don’t need travelling salesmen, their products travel. Oh, have you heard of this thing called the “Internet”?
    Steve apparently still thinks along the lines of 20th century pre-internet age. Or should I say, pre-Google age.

    Cynics, you need to watch and learn from Google.

  • http://www.regard.com/ Steve Beauregard, REGARD Solut

    First, sorry for the typo! Re: Google not in the manufacturing business…I beg to differ! The second you stamp your brand name on a piece of hardware…GUESS WHAT…you are in the manufacturing business with all the support headaches that come with it. Apple has been in this business for a couple of decades now!

    All you say of Google is true right NOW…they have just stepped into a NEW BUSINESS! The proof (as they say) will be in the pudding as to “IF” they can figure out how to run that business! Having worked for software companies, hardware companies and service providers…I can tell you each is a drastically different business. The potential for them to come out of this with their first big fat big black eye is high…IMHO!

    Only time will tell!

  • http://www.regard.com/ Steve Beauregard, REGARD Solut

    First, sorry for the typo! Re: Google not in the manufacturing business…I beg to differ! The second you stamp your brand name on a piece of hardware…GUESS WHAT…you are in the manufacturing business with all the support headaches that come with it. Apple has been in this business for a couple of decades now!

    All you say of Google is true right NOW…they have just stepped into a NEW BUSINESS! The proof (as they say) will be in the pudding as to “IF” they can figure out how to run that business! Having worked for software companies, hardware companies and service providers…I can tell you each is a drastically different business. The potential for them to come out of this with their first big fat big black eye is high…IMHO!

    Only time will tell!

  • http://www.regard.com Steve Beauregard, REGARD Solution

    First, sorry for the typo! Re: Google not in the manufacturing business…I beg to differ! The second you stamp your brand name on a piece of hardware…GUESS WHAT…you are in the manufacturing business with all the support headaches that come with it. Apple has been in this business for a couple of decades now!

    All you say of Google is true right NOW…they have just stepped into a NEW BUSINESS! The proof (as they say) will be in the pudding as to “IF” they can figure out how to run that business! Having worked for software companies, hardware companies and service providers…I can tell you each is a drastically different business. The potential for them to come out of this with their first big fat big black eye is high…IMHO!

    Only time will tell!

  • Patrick

    That was the most uninformed article I have ever read.
    “The nuances of running a hardware manufacturing business is drastically different than writing software and making support tweaks. ”
    Which is why HTC is building it, not google.

    “it doesn’t matter how amazing your product is, you still need to market and sell it.”
    What problems will google have with marketing and selling, millions (maybe billions) of people use google everyday. There is a link on their homepage (www.google.com). Millions of people can see it without google paying $.01 for advertising. And you can buy it directly from that page. Not to mention it is available subsidized from t-mobile, and already announced that it will available through Verizon, and Vodafone in the Spring.

    “The first hurdle for Google will be to convince Motorola, HTC and other (now) third party manufacturers that this won’t impact them”
    Umm.. maybe you should do A LITTLE bit of research.. HTC makes the Nexus One..
    And yes, I can gree with you about one thing, this will be bad for Motorola.

    “Secondly, by releasing Nexus One as a GSM unlocked Smartphone and selling direct, Google thumbs both nostrils at the carriers.”
    Good. At some point their needs to be a separation from devices and carriers. Would you buy a computer subsidized from your cable provider?

    “As I learned when REGARD was in the device business, it is really hard to sell against “Free”.”
    Iphone isn’t free. Blackberry isn’t free. Droid isn’t free. People still buy them? Not to mention the the subsidized price of the nexus one from t-mobile is cheaper than the iphone and the droid (not sure the of the blackberry prices).

    “For Nexus One to be successful, the go-to-market strategy will have to be one of differentiation and distribution through either well established carrier channels or they will have to revolutionize the distribution model as DELL did with a direct only sales model and killing everyone else on price. Presently, it looks as if they are doing neither.”
    T-mobile and verizon are pretty well established carrier-channels, aren’t they?

    “As for how the release of Nexus One impacts BlackBerry and iPhone? Until Google addresses the issues above, there will be no impact except slight cannibalization of their third party Android sales.”
    I have an iphone, and i can’t wait to get rid of it for the N1. I know several people with blackberries who feel the same way, and also one person who bought a droid less than 30 days ago who is returning it and waiting for the N1 to come to verizon.

    “Nonetheless, Nexus One looks amazing and, just in case everything I said above proves to be flat out wrong, I am ordering one today for my Android development team.”
    You are definately wrong, go order a couple more.

  • Patrick

    That was the most uninformed article I have ever read.
    “The nuances of running a hardware manufacturing business is drastically different than writing software and making support tweaks. ”
    Which is why HTC is building it, not google.

    “it doesn’t matter how amazing your product is, you still need to market and sell it.”
    What problems will google have with marketing and selling, millions (maybe billions) of people use google everyday. There is a link on their homepage (www.google.com). Millions of people can see it without google paying $.01 for advertising. And you can buy it directly from that page. Not to mention it is available subsidized from t-mobile, and already announced that it will available through Verizon, and Vodafone in the Spring.

    “The first hurdle for Google will be to convince Motorola, HTC and other (now) third party manufacturers that this won’t impact them”
    Umm.. maybe you should do A LITTLE bit of research.. HTC makes the Nexus One..
    And yes, I can gree with you about one thing, this will be bad for Motorola.

    “Secondly, by releasing Nexus One as a GSM unlocked Smartphone and selling direct, Google thumbs both nostrils at the carriers.”
    Good. At some point their needs to be a separation from devices and carriers. Would you buy a computer subsidized from your cable provider?

    “As I learned when REGARD was in the device business, it is really hard to sell against “Free”.”
    Iphone isn’t free. Blackberry isn’t free. Droid isn’t free. People still buy them? Not to mention the the subsidized price of the nexus one from t-mobile is cheaper than the iphone and the droid (not sure the of the blackberry prices).

    “For Nexus One to be successful, the go-to-market strategy will have to be one of differentiation and distribution through either well established carrier channels or they will have to revolutionize the distribution model as DELL did with a direct only sales model and killing everyone else on price. Presently, it looks as if they are doing neither.”
    T-mobile and verizon are pretty well established carrier-channels, aren’t they?

    “As for how the release of Nexus One impacts BlackBerry and iPhone? Until Google addresses the issues above, there will be no impact except slight cannibalization of their third party Android sales.”
    I have an iphone, and i can’t wait to get rid of it for the N1. I know several people with blackberries who feel the same way, and also one person who bought a droid less than 30 days ago who is returning it and waiting for the N1 to come to verizon.

    “Nonetheless, Nexus One looks amazing and, just in case everything I said above proves to be flat out wrong, I am ordering one today for my Android development team.”
    You are definately wrong, go order a couple more.

  • http://www.regard.com/ Steve Beauregard, REGARD Solut

    Despite the fact that it is OEM from HTC, I still content that stamping your brand on it puts you squarely in the “manufacturing business”…

    It’s OK that you mainline the Google Kool Aid…one thing I understand clearly is religion…and clearly the above group HAVE IT!

    What is lacking in your comments above is perspective! Do you have ANY idea now how many customers I hear complain about their phones that have done NOTHING about it for years!?! Some people just like to complain!

    There are many “FREE” BlackBerry & iPhone offers out there…just “Google it” or walk into Radio Shack…so touche….you missed that one in your research! Those that don’t yet have free offers WILL…because consumers are sheep!

  • http://www.regard.com/ Steve Beauregard, REGARD Solut

    Despite the fact that it is OEM from HTC, I still content that stamping your brand on it puts you squarely in the “manufacturing business”…

    It’s OK that you mainline the Google Kool Aid…one thing I understand clearly is religion…and clearly the above group HAVE IT!

    What is lacking in your comments above is perspective! Do you have ANY idea now how many customers I hear complain about their phones that have done NOTHING about it for years!?! Some people just like to complain!

    There are many “FREE” BlackBerry & iPhone offers out there…just “Google it” or walk into Radio Shack…so touche….you missed that one in your research! Those that don’t yet have free offers WILL…because consumers are sheep!

  • http://www.regard.com Steve Beauregard, REGARD Solution

    Despite the fact that it is OEM from HTC, I still content that stamping your brand on it puts you squarely in the “manufacturing business”…

    It’s OK that you mainline the Google Kool Aid…one thing I understand clearly is religion…and clearly the above group HAVE IT!

    What is lacking in your comments above is perspective! Do you have ANY idea now how many customers I hear complain about their phones that have done NOTHING about it for years!?! Some people just like to complain!

    There are many “FREE” BlackBerry & iPhone offers out there…just “Google it” or walk into Radio Shack…so touche….you missed that one in your research! Those that don’t yet have free offers WILL…because consumers are sheep!

  • RyanMacG

    To be fair Steve you’re just as bad as those of us that are advocating the Nexus as an option for having drunk the “Kool-Aid” your personal flavour however is RIM/BlackBerry and that’s fine but don’t hate other people for holding a company in equally high respect especially with better reason.

  • RyanMacG

    To be fair Steve you’re just as bad as those of us that are advocating the Nexus as an option for having drunk the “Kool-Aid” your personal flavour however is RIM/BlackBerry and that’s fine but don’t hate other people for holding a company in equally high respect especially with better reason.

  • http://www.blackberrycool.com/author/collinf CollinF

    Ummm… they already have the support of providers, along with discounted pricing that goes with it:
    https://www.google.com/phone/choose?locale=en_US&s7e=
    If you search the TMO site for the Nexus, they send you to the Google page to buy it.

    As for free, we all know that if you wait long enough for ANY device (a couple of months these days) and are willing to pay the price elsewhere (read: 2-3 year contract), that SOMEONE will offer it to you for free.

    As far as marketing goes, we are discussing this on a blackberry website filled with Google ad space, and the Nexus is what is sitting right next to the article in my browser.

    While I would typically agree with most of the article, we are not talking about a typical company. We are talking about Google. A massive beast with a golden touch. I don’t think they’re killing any other phones or anything, but I sure don’t see this endeavor being anything close to a failure either.

  • http://www.blackberrycool.com/author/collinf CollinF

    Ummm… they already have the support of providers, along with discounted pricing that goes with it:
    https://www.google.com/phone/choose?locale=en_US&s7e=
    If you search the TMO site for the Nexus, they send you to the Google page to buy it.

    As for free, we all know that if you wait long enough for ANY device (a couple of months these days) and are willing to pay the price elsewhere (read: 2-3 year contract), that SOMEONE will offer it to you for free.

    As far as marketing goes, we are discussing this on a blackberry website filled with Google ad space, and the Nexus is what is sitting right next to the article in my browser.

    While I would typically agree with most of the article, we are not talking about a typical company. We are talking about Google. A massive beast with a golden touch. I don’t think they’re killing any other phones or anything, but I sure don’t see this endeavor being anything close to a failure either.

  • http://joshlloyd.tumblr.com/ Josh Lloyd

    I am actually on the verge of ordering a Nexus One myself. I’ve been waiting for Android to prove itself as a worthy opponent against my love for the BlackBerry, and I believe it finally has. I’m ready for something new, though.

    I have been with BlackBerry since the pre-phone days, when they were just 2-way pagers. Although I think they’re amazing, well-built phones (for the most part), I feel like I’m ready to move on. Since I’m already with T-Mobile, it’s going to be an easy transition. The only learning curve I have ahead of me is the on-screen keyboard!

    BlackBerry has failed me in these areas- multimedia, processor speed, browser speed and functionality (although the latest is much better), and some of their phones are very cheaply made. I have the 8900 now. Loved the phone when I first got it, and haven’t had any problems. BUT, I’ve read more reviews on how people have had to return them for faulty parts than I care to admit to any iphone user. Some people going through more than 3 8900′s before finally getting a keeper. The keyboard on my phone moves around worse than a fake floor-model phone (luckily it doesn’t effect typing), and the “chrome” trim turned out to be made of plastic. Seemed like a lame shortcut.

    Also, I’ve heard so many bad reviews of the Storm, it’s sad. I’m afraid BlackBerry may be losing in the phone race over the long term. I hope they can adapt! But it’s going to take a lot, I fear.

  • http://joshlloyd.tumblr.com/ Josh Lloyd

    I am actually on the verge of ordering a Nexus One myself. I’ve been waiting for Android to prove itself as a worthy opponent against my love for the BlackBerry, and I believe it finally has. I’m ready for something new, though.

    I have been with BlackBerry since the pre-phone days, when they were just 2-way pagers. Although I think they’re amazing, well-built phones (for the most part), I feel like I’m ready to move on. Since I’m already with T-Mobile, it’s going to be an easy transition. The only learning curve I have ahead of me is the on-screen keyboard!

    BlackBerry has failed me in these areas- multimedia, processor speed, browser speed and functionality (although the latest is much better), and some of their phones are very cheaply made. I have the 8900 now. Loved the phone when I first got it, and haven’t had any problems. BUT, I’ve read more reviews on how people have had to return them for faulty parts than I care to admit to any iphone user. Some people going through more than 3 8900′s before finally getting a keeper. The keyboard on my phone moves around worse than a fake floor-model phone (luckily it doesn’t effect typing), and the “chrome” trim turned out to be made of plastic. Seemed like a lame shortcut.

    Also, I’ve heard so many bad reviews of the Storm, it’s sad. I’m afraid BlackBerry may be losing in the phone race over the long term. I hope they can adapt! But it’s going to take a lot, I fear.

  • http://joshlloyd.tumblr.com Josh Lloyd

    I am actually on the verge of ordering a Nexus One myself. I’ve been waiting for Android to prove itself as a worthy opponent against my love for the BlackBerry, and I believe it finally has. I’m ready for something new, though.

    I have been with BlackBerry since the pre-phone days, when they were just 2-way pagers. Although I think they’re amazing, well-built phones (for the most part), I feel like I’m ready to move on. Since I’m already with T-Mobile, it’s going to be an easy transition. The only learning curve I have ahead of me is the on-screen keyboard!

    BlackBerry has failed me in these areas- multimedia, processor speed, browser speed and functionality (although the latest is much better), and some of their phones are very cheaply made. I have the 8900 now. Loved the phone when I first got it, and haven’t had any problems. BUT, I’ve read more reviews on how people have had to return them for faulty parts than I care to admit to any iphone user. Some people going through more than 3 8900′s before finally getting a keeper. The keyboard on my phone moves around worse than a fake floor-model phone (luckily it doesn’t effect typing), and the “chrome” trim turned out to be made of plastic. Seemed like a lame shortcut.

    Also, I’ve heard so many bad reviews of the Storm, it’s sad. I’m afraid BlackBerry may be losing in the phone race over the long term. I hope they can adapt! But it’s going to take a lot, I fear.

  • http://caspan.com/ Caspan

    I find with anything Google they like to give stuff away for free because they catch the flip side of the ad revenue and as someone else mentioned can have full control over sifting through the data that goes to and from these devices. The thing most people forget is Google might be charging a high price for these devices but remember they are not a carrier they might make a few buks with the data information that is recovered from your phone but most users are going through the carrier towers not them. Unless Google starts to collect information and send stats back to their home servers to collect the data (which someone will hack to prevent it’s open source remember!) how will they recoup the costs of the device other then charging full price or costs for the device.

    It will be an interesting situation to see how they price their devices based on what they think they will get back from it. IE you sign up for a 3 year Google account that must report once a week to their servers to collect data and ensure you don’t stop it. This will allow them to give you a device at a lower price. Next to that they could still make deals with GSM providers to say if we sell our phone and get a 3 year contract with you will you give us kick back for the device. Its not having the providers sell the devices but including them on the sale just like dell sells ISP connections with their computers.

    It will be interesting to see carriers start offering $10-$15 a month plan if you sign up for 3 year/2 year contracts with them and that way your plan is cheaper only because you never had to buy a phone from them. Because what is to keep you with them if the next provider can offer the same package and price there needs to be something for the consumer to win. If I am going to pay $60 a month and get no phone and no kick back on plans why stay with a carrier. even still some carriers are requiring a 1 year min contract with a new service with no phone purchase in Canada.

    It will for sure interesting to see what happens.

  • http://caspan.com Caspan

    I find with anything Google they like to give stuff away for free because they catch the flip side of the ad revenue and as someone else mentioned can have full control over sifting through the data that goes to and from these devices. The thing most people forget is Google might be charging a high price for these devices but remember they are not a carrier they might make a few buks with the data information that is recovered from your phone but most users are going through the carrier towers not them. Unless Google starts to collect information and send stats back to their home servers to collect the data (which someone will hack to prevent it’s open source remember!) how will they recoup the costs of the device other then charging full price or costs for the device.

    It will be an interesting situation to see how they price their devices based on what they think they will get back from it. IE you sign up for a 3 year Google account that must report once a week to their servers to collect data and ensure you don’t stop it. This will allow them to give you a device at a lower price. Next to that they could still make deals with GSM providers to say if we sell our phone and get a 3 year contract with you will you give us kick back for the device. Its not having the providers sell the devices but including them on the sale just like dell sells ISP connections with their computers.

    It will be interesting to see carriers start offering $10-$15 a month plan if you sign up for 3 year/2 year contracts with them and that way your plan is cheaper only because you never had to buy a phone from them. Because what is to keep you with them if the next provider can offer the same package and price there needs to be something for the consumer to win. If I am going to pay $60 a month and get no phone and no kick back on plans why stay with a carrier. even still some carriers are requiring a 1 year min contract with a new service with no phone purchase in Canada.

    It will for sure interesting to see what happens.

  • http://www.regard.com/ Steve Beauregard, REGARD Solut

    And the hits keep coming…turns out we didn’t have to wait until May to see the pains…i love Google…I like the Android…I know what works! Your mileage may vary!

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/13/technology/companies/13google.html?scp=2&sq=Google%20Nexus

  • http://www.regard.com Steve Beauregard, REGARD Solution

    And the hits keep coming…turns out we didn’t have to wait until May to see the pains…i love Google…I like the Android…I know what works! Your mileage may vary!

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/13/technology/companies/13google.html?scp=2&sq=Google%20Nexus

  • BeauST

    I hate to say “I TOLD YOU SO” regarding Google's NexusOne …actually…that is not true! I LOVE being right! Verizon Cancels Nexus One!

    http://www.appleinsider.com/articles/10/04/26/g

  • BeauST

    The day Google announced Nexus One, I wrote this blog entry predicting this outcome…I HATE to say “I TOLD YOU SO”! Actually, I enjoy being right more than that…especially as the Google faithful “blasted me” for my opinion in the comment string below!

    Read this link Google cancels plans for Nexus One CDMA release on Verizon!

    http://www.appleinsider.com/articles/10/04/26/g