Impressions About BlackBerry Enterprise Server Express

15 Comments

BESX

I’ve been talking with Brian Reed at BoxTone about this latest BESX announcement and he has some interesting insight into what this means for SMBs but also large enterprise. During our discussion, I was surprised to hear that only 10-20% of the Fortune 2000 companies are using mobile devices. I assume this number is so low due to large manufacturing industries that have less of a need for mobile, but the number is still very low. As more people in general get smartphones, we’ll start seeing this number inflate in the next 3-4 years, possibly as high as 70-80%.

With so many more employees using smartphones, companies will want to have these users on a BES, without paying the exorbitant costs for every user. BES Express opens up new doors for these companies, allowing them to connect with more functionality than “activesync-connected” and yet same price – free. This announcement therefore goes a long way to addressing the claim that the BES solution was too expensive, and providing companies with a freemium style service. It almost makes you wonder why it took so long to get here.

So that is what’s going on in the large enterprise space, but RIM specifically mentioned the SMB and consumer market. RIM are pointing to couple of different angles and prosumers vs consumers can easily get blurred. The first angle is consumerization of IT, where end users are in control and making their own demands. The second angle, as it were, is that these users are buying their own smartphones and then asking IT to connect them. The original prosumer model was just use BIS in the cloud or run standalone. What’s new is these consumers are employees and demanding to get them connected to the enterprise, large or small, and do not want to run them in isolation.

The third angle that RIM isn’t really addressing is the consumer who doesn’t have an enterprise – the ones who have a BlackBerry very little understanding of what it can do. These users are coming from the feature phone world, and they’re the ones you see TV and print marketing targeted towards. This is not for them at all. Personally, I think this market has the most potential to swell over the years, and RIM is going to have to push out a BESX type solution to them. Consumers want the same sync and BlackBerry Shield features that enterprise want, so give it to them.

  • http://caspan.com/ Caspan

    What will this new feature cost? I'm curious to know what resellers can charge for this service since it's free. Are they bound to not sell the service but then bundle the costs somewhere else in the package? Or will this be a value add service at no cost?

  • http://caspan.com Caspan

    What will this new feature cost? I'm curious to know what resellers can charge for this service since it's free. Are they bound to not sell the service but then bundle the costs somewhere else in the package? Or will this be a value add service at no cost?

  • Opper

    Why is nobody talking about the difference between the express version and the normal version? What are the limitations of the express version?

  • Opper

    Why is nobody talking about the difference between the express version and the normal version? What are the limitations of the express version?

  • Opper

    Why is nobody talking about the difference between the express version and the normal version? What are the limitations of the express version?

  • Opper
  • Opper
  • tonypry

    All this talk about file access is great but when is the loop going to be closed? RIM have positioned the Smartphone as a computing device over the last number of months yet it is still somewhat short when comes to modifying content and updating that back into the enterprise or smb server. This type of functionality you would expect from any computing device local or remote, now you can leave your laptop behindTony PrylowskiCEO ExSafe

  • tonypry

    All this talk about file access is great but when is the loop going to be closed? RIM have positioned the Smartphone as a computing device over the last number of months yet it is still somewhat short when comes to modifying content and updating that back into the enterprise or smb server. This type of functionality you would expect from any computing device local or remote, now you can leave your laptop behind

    Tony Prylowski

    CEO ExSafe

  • Want's more options

    Glad RIM decide to do this for smail business. I have my own blackberry and my employer reimburses me for the cost of the data plan from my carrier. Enterprise was way too expensive for our office so this will be a big help to me.

  • Want's more options

    Glad RIM decide to do this for smail business. I have my own blackberry and my employer reimburses me for the cost of the data plan from my carrier. Enterprise was way too expensive for our office so this will be a big help to me.

  • Want's more options

    Glad RIM decide to do this for smail business. I have my own blackberry and my employer reimburses me for the cost of the data plan from my carrier. Enterprise was way too expensive for our office so this will be a big help to me.

  • mfarney

    Don't know how the rest of you feel about it, but since I bought my Blackberry Eneterprise Server Express I decided there was no other choice. It works fine for me, it's fast enough and reliable.
    Mathew Franey | UK VPS

  • Bromage

    Installation of BlackBerry Enterprise Server Express was pain-free – after filling in my details on BlackBerry’s website, I received an email with a link to the 600MB download as well as a licence key.
    We already had the full BlackBerry Enterprise Server installed, so we were interested to see what the Express edition had to offer given that it doesn’t require a dedicated server. Pleasingly, it provides many of the basic administrative features for supporting and managing end users’ Blackberries. The web-based interface provides uncluttered access to a range of features and is fairly self explanatory – we found it really easy to get the hang of it.
    BlackBerries are rolled out across our entire sales team, so we’re fairly reliant on the full version of BlackBerry Enterprise Server. However, I can see the attraction of the Express edition, particularly for those who have no formal provision for managing workers’ smartphones in the office.
    For businesses with a small number of BlackBerries deployued, and for those who only want basic access to an Exchange server, BESx could fit the bill.

  • Derek McCall

    I found the install process quite complicated. It took me about three hours and I had problems setting up the web server and user accounts. I could have used more help during this process. Once I was up and running though things got a lot easier. The Administration Service page makes it really easy to manage user groups and set rules. I could even upgrade the operating system on a users’ BlackBerry. I could also hand over some control to the users. There are some brilliant security features. You can wipe a lost smartphone from the console and lock out Bluetooth, for instance. And there are loads of policies that BlackBerry has set up so you can select them off the shelf. All in all I’d recommend BesX to any small business that has a load of BlackBerrys.