RIM Makes BlackBerry Code Signing Keys Free for Tablet and Smartphones

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Back at the last BlackBerry Developer Conference, RIM announced that they would waive all the fees for registering and deploying apps to App World. The move made a lot of sense and really helped RIM get increased interest from developers. There was also a bit of a downside, as App World became flooded with BlackBerry Themes, which aren’t exactly apps. In a similar move, RIM has made the signing keys, which used to cost $20, free for the Tablet and Smartphone OS.

According to the site:

BlackBerry Code Signing Keys are now free! Why do we require a valid credit card?

We require a $1 authorization to ensure the validity of the information provided. The authorization only decreases your spending limit by $1 for a short period and you are never charged the $1.

At this point, it’s not clear why a developer would even need a signing key. Perhaps the next step will be to do away with the signing keys altogether.

Read more over at the BlackBerry Developer blog.

  • Dean

    As a blackberry site, I’m very surprised that the comment, “…it’s not clear why a developer would even need a signing key. Perhaps the next step will be to do away with the signing
    If this isn’t clear to you, then I question your ability to properly cover the blackberry platform.

    As a blackberry user, I absolutely cherish the fact that Blackberry is the most secure mobile platform. Perhaps not as popular as iOS or Android, but it’s more secure, hands-down. This is so misunderstood by the general public. Andoroid users, in particular, don’t know how open their handsets really are, and how there is almost zero control there is to take data from your phone. Motorola gets it and their moving fast to make Android more secure.

    I absolutely want blackberry developers to use signing keys. It’s the only way to hold developers accountable for releasing bad or malicious code.

    Drop the signing keys for a developer, and their applications immediatley cannot push notifiications, nor handle subscription services, and blackberry can also stop any malicious data traffic.

    If the developer violates the terms of the licensing agreement, it’s more than just keeping their apps from app world…blackberry can keep the apps from sending/receiving data via the BES/BIS servers.keys altogether.”

  • BB App Dev

    Dean, I agree with you 100%.

    If the poster makes the statement, “At this point, it’s not clear why a developer would even need a signing key. Perhaps the next step will be to do away with the signing keys altogether.” they shouldn’t be posting on a blackberry “site” in the first place.

  • bethany

    why cant there be free blackberry for every kid that would be veryn good ha nha :)

  • http://twitter.com/cybstorm Denis Richardson

    I agree, Dean. I am equally happy to hear RIMS take initiative to increase their portfolio of apps by the same token taken the precaution to maintain control over what get’s published into the repository.

    However, the $$$ have never been much of a problem, at least not from my past experience, but rather the turn around time to acquire the certs has been more of an issue… eg 3-4 weeks the last two times I needed to have RIMS process my application…

    I would say, if they haven’t improved their internal process and capacity to deliver certs in a timely fashion… well that should be their next step.

    All things considered, I think this is good news for the users and RIMS overall marketing strategy.

    My thoughts,
    Denis