RIM Opposes Apple’s Trademark Filing for “WebKit” in Canada

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RIM has filed an official opposing action against Apple’s trademark filing for “WebKit” in Canada. Currently, WebKit is an open source project, but the term “Webkit” seems to be first used by Apple as far as we can tell. It’s not clear on what grounds RIM is going to defend the trademark filing and we’ll have to wait for the official documents. Continue reading after the break.

Webkit trademark
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Apple has a pretty good footing in this trademark case as the company was the one to release Webkit to the community as an open source project. Also, Apple has been using the “kit” suffix in OS X development frameworks for a long time. Examples include AppKit and UIKit. RIM is likely putting its legal team to work in a defensive measure to keep Apple at bay as the trademark could have financial repercussions.

Read more about this story over at PatentlyApple.

  • http://twitter.com/Hardened Hardened

    Consider I’m WELL aware of the very first phone (or PDA phone, or smartphone of ANY kind on the worldwide market) to feature the Webkit -Engine was the Nokia N80 slider S60 phone … which predates the RIM 8800 which did NOT even have webkit engine I’d say Apple is definitely in the right here.

    1. Nokia sought after Apple for a new mobile browser … the “Nokia Web-Engine Browser”.
    (Apple was Nokia’s silent partner in this).
    2. The Bolt browser & the Torch browser company’s did NOT exist when the N80 or the N80 Golf Edition existed. In fact they didn’t until 3yrs after.
    3. RIM released the BlackBerry 8800 when Nokia released the N80 Slider (S60 smartphone).

    Come to think of it … RIM’s claim that they where making ‘smartphones before anyone called them smartphone’s’ (or new what it was) is a bit off. Nokia began the world’s first mass produced and globally available (on 3 continents) with the infamous 7650! The ONLY device to debut before then that melded a PDA into a phone in that form factor ~ was the Ericsson R380 … which used PSION the precursor to Symbian. Back then PSION was much more powerful to the upcoming PALM OS in the PDA but it had European roots and a better following vs Palm’s US  attributed success.