Sometimes It’s Great That Startups Ignore BlackBerry

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Sometimes it’s nice to get a break from the startup world. It seems Silicon Valley churns out the next “game changing” startup about once a month and the vast majority of these companies are a waste of everybody’s time. Take Kevin Rose’s Oink for example. It’s not a bad a idea, it’s just a waste of your time. No offence to Rose because Oink would be awesome if everyone in your city used it, but that’s incredibly unlikely. What’s more likely is that this idea will pivot about six times until it’s something very different than what it started, or the idea will simply fade into oblivion. In the meantime, if you’re an iPhone user and your friends are into trying every free app that hits the App Store, you will likely get bombarded with friend requests for each of these startups.


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This all goes back to what RIM has been touting in its ad campaigns lately. The message is “I’m about action, not distraction.” Now, there are many other reasons why startups don’t first flock to BlackBerry first and a lack of a Silicon Valley presence is just one. There’s also a perception that BlackBerry isn’t a good starting point due to low download rates and a small North American user base. Whatever the reasons may be, it’s sometimes nice to know that your platform isn’t going to get a startup until it has mass appeal and is actually useful.

This will probably change with BlackBerry 10. Currently, we’re seeing a ton of Android and iOS games flock to the PlayBook and it looks like this will continue until the BlackBerry 10 smartphones come out. Unless there’s differentiation in the platform that we don’t know about yet, BlackBerry 10 smartphones will eventually become indistinguishable from an Android device in terms of available apps. Until then, BlackBerry users can continue to use great productivity apps like ASAP Pro while iPhone users Oink away.

For a good discussion about Oink, check out Untether.tv’s “Where’s the Money?”.