Author: Devin Kent

WES Exhibitor Spotlight: Blue Systems

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Blue Systems is a relative newcomer to the mobile market. Though founded in 2002, they only recently released their financial software, called Blue. Blue Mobile, which we’ll hopefully get a chance to see at WES, allows user to track stocks, financial news, and other information directly from their phone. It also features a secure, built-in instant messenger to speak with your broker, programmable alerts, powerful charting, and a lot more. It’s available for $19.95/month, which they say is less than 20% of the price of their competitors.

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Balsillie talks with ZDNet

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After the recent announcement of SAP’s CRM software appearing natively on BlackBerry, ZDNet editor Larry Dignan got a chance to sit down and talk with RIM co-CEO Jim Balsillie about a number of things. High on the list of subjects was, of course, the recent Kickstart leak, as well as the rumors of a touchscreen. Balsillie pointed out two things: first, that RIM is “not religious” about any form factor, and secondly that leaks aren’t always correct. They also spent a great deal of time talking about RIM’s strategy in the B2B (business to business) space, as compared with their efforts in the consumer or B2C space. Balsillie said that you need both to successfully sell phones, and that “ninety percent of the work you do in B2B works for B2C.”

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WES Exhibitor Spotlight: Trackaphone

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Trackaphone offers location based services for business that need to track their employees or their assets while they’re in the field. The Asset Locator and The People Locator work similarly, giving businesses the ability to keep an eye on phones, employees, GPS devices, lone worker protection devices, and more. Both work with Mobile Finder, a stripped down version of the software that lets you keep an eye on the field even while you’re on the move. So far it’s only available on the 8800, so hopefully we’ll see support for more models at WES.

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Zumobi is just around the corner

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In their latest newsletter, Zumobi announced that they’re putting the “finishing touches” on the BlackBerry version of their software. If you head over to their home page you can sign up to be informed the minute it’s released. They’ve also made a couple of additions to their Tiles gallery, from notables CMT and Comedy Central. The CMT Tile delivers up-to-date news in the country music world, while Comedy Central offers up a new Joke of the Day Tile.

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BlackBerry 8330 starts hitting shelves

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Three major carriers have released the BlackBerry Curve 8330 or are gearing up to do so shortly, in addition to those that have had them out for a while. As promised, Alltell is now offering the badboy in their online store for $299 after online discount and mail-in rebate. Sprint ads for it are appearing in American newspapers, offering a red or titanium Curve with a price of $179 after rebate, and with a two contract. Finally, Verizon’s will be available online and over the phone on May 9th, and over other channels on the 12th. It’s reported to be going for $270 after a $50 rebate and a 2 year contract.

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Godiva announces mobile chocolate ordering

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If you’re a chocolate connoisseur, you might be interested in this new offering from Godiva. Godiva Chocolatier brings the Godiva catalog right to your BlackBerry, giving you access to the entire assortment of tasty treats from wherever you happen to be. It also integrates with your address book, allowing you to quickly send a package to anyone you know. Point your phone to http://www.godiva.com/mobile/default.aspx to download the app.

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SAP integrates CRM solution into BlackBerry

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German-based enterprise powerhouse SAP has announced that they will be natively integrating their CRM software into the BlackBerry, with the rest of their business suite to follow. BlackBerrys with SAP’s CRM software will be shipping in the next couple months, and SAP’s EVP and general manager promised that the rest of the suite would be brought on board in “months, not years.” The article raises concerns over the outages that plagued RIM earlier this year, and the effect is might have on mission-critical business apps, but RIM co-CEO Jim Balsillie said they were “not acceptable” and that they had taken steps to prevent them from ever happening again.

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WES Exhibitor Spotlight: TeleNav

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TeleNav is a leader in mobile GPS needs. They were the company behind AT&T’s GPS offering, and were chosen as one of Pinstack’s Five Star picks. TeleNav GPS Navigator offers everything you’d expect from a GPS suite: directions, both written and spoken, points of interest, traffic warnings, and more. You can preview routes before you set out, and if you miss a turn the software will automatically create a new one to get you back on track. It also offers 2D and 3D maps and a bunch of customization options. Considering the growing popularity of GPS in BlackBerrys, they should have some very nice demos on display at WES.

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WES Exhibitor Spotlight: Microvision

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Microvision makes some of the neatest mobile hardware I’ve come across so far. Their micro-projector technology can be embedded into a device when it’s manufactured, or used in a standalone version that attaches to your phone. Either one can be used to project images, videos, presentations, etc. onto any surface you could use a real projector on. Even cooler, they’re working on technology that would use the PicoP projection engine to stream whatever is on your phone straight to your glasses. The glasses can be completely opaque for an immersive experience or partially transparent if you want to walk around the mall while you’re wearing them. I’m sure they’ll put on quite a show at WES.

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Adobe offers free Flash license for mobile development

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Adobe has announced the launch of the Open Screen Project with support from notables like Nokia, Samsung, Intel, and NBC, amongst others. The Open Screen Project hopes to make the mobile internet experience better by giving away Flash for mobile device development, as well as opening up some of the protocols used in the software. The aim is to give developers a standard environment to develop for, rather than having to build, in some cases, over a hundred different versions to run across as wide an array of devices as possible. Flash is becoming more and more prevalent on mobile phones, with Adobe expecting it to ship on over a billion devices by 2009, so this very good news for the industry as a whole.

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