Tag: abi-research

Wireless carriers to spend $3.3 billion on LTE in 2011

Comments

LTE is going to be an incredible evolutionary step for BlackBerry and smartphones. The technology will change the way we use data on our phone as well as aid carriers in coping with an increased network load.

According to research from ABI, wireless operators will spend about $3.3 billion building LTE base stations in 2011. That expenditure will have purchased some 142,000 base stations worldwide. LTE base station equipment spending is expected to rise sharply between 2011 and the end of 2012.

“Vendors will be shipping base station equipment in significant quantities in 2010 ahead of limited trials that typically last about a year, followed by full commercial launches,” says senior analyst Nadine Manjaro. “Many operators have been talking about re-use of existing equipment, but ABI Research understands that while there may be sharing of masts and cabinets most of those 142,000 base stations will have completely new baseband and RF components, because operators will generally try to keep the new LTE networks separate from their legacy networks.”
Continue reading the ABI Research data regarding LTE

Share:
  • TwitThis
  • StumbleUpon
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • NewsVine
  • E-mail this story to a friend!

Reminder: RIM Q3 results announced today

Comment

RIMIn case you’ve forgotten, RIM’s conference call is tonight at 5 PM EST. ABI Research is guessing that BlackBerry will have cornered 10% of the smartphone market after this quarter, second only to Nokia. RIM’s stock took a nice jump this morning, showing some investor confidence despite a few shaky weeks. These calls tend to be pretty optimisic, but question period could bring up some issues hint at RIM’s direction for the new year. We’ll be sure to give you guys the low-down first thing tomorrow morning.

Share:
  • TwitThis
  • StumbleUpon
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • NewsVine
  • E-mail this story to a friend!

GPS-enabled handsets to make $100 billion

Comment

A new ABI Research paper is forecasting $100 billion to be made from GPS-enabled handsets, like the BlackBerry 8310, in 2012. In terms of units, that translates to 240 million mobile sales next year to 550 million in four years. Now, I’ve gone on the record for being pro-GPS and all, but Wi-Fi still seems like the feature of choice for a lot of people. Manufacturers are going to be in a tough position where, in an attempt to keep costs low and their handsets slim, they’ll need to be picky about what they would rather have under the hood, and ABI seems to think that many will go with GPS. Which are you guys siding with?

Share:
  • TwitThis
  • StumbleUpon
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • NewsVine
  • E-mail this story to a friend!

Enterprise users are big spenders outside of work too

Comments

ABIA free ABI Research paper has just come out on enterprise usage of mobile devices, primarily outlining how heavy-duty corporate users are and that there’s still room for service providers to get in on the big spending. On average, enterprise users spend 80% more on data services than regular consumers, the average revenue per user generated is 24% higher, and even spend 78% more on consumer-centric services. The report suggests that keeping enterprise and consumer services separate is detrimental to business, and that providers can rake in the dough if they bundle enterprise and consumer products together. The report also highlights the moderate interest in Wi-Fi; it’s seen largely as an unnecessary feature, but will still be something to pull in new handset owners.

Share:
  • TwitThis
  • StumbleUpon
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • NewsVine
  • E-mail this story to a friend!

Handset recycling means big bucks

Comments

A new ABI Research paper just came out citing $3.5 billion to be made from selling refurbished handsets in 2007.

ABI Research industry analyst Shailendra Pandey says, “Recycled and refurbished handsets can help mobile operators in improving per-customer profitability by allowing better management of subscriber acquisition costs. Operators can use these handsets to address low ARPU subscribers and start generating profits on low margin accounts quickly, rather than having to wait to recover subsidies on new handsets.”

When you put it that way, the quick succession of new BlackBerry releases doesn’t sound like such a crazy idea. Busting out the BlackBerry 8310 just results in discounted 8300s that appeal to a lower-spending customer. ABI is forecasting continued growth in the market, hitting $6 billion in refurbished handsets in 2012. On that note, RIM’s got a Trade-Up program available for folks looking to get rid of their old BlackBerry and upgrade.

Share:
  • TwitThis
  • StumbleUpon
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • NewsVine
  • E-mail this story to a friend!

Memory cards to outsell headsets

Comments

Memory cardsABI Research just published a paper today that forecasts memory cards to have sold $7 billion this year, while headsets take second place in the mobile accessory market at $5 billion. The prime reason for this is that headsets are becoming more frequently bundled with devices, while memory cards still need to be bought separately. This shift isn’t a huge surprise, since mobile multimedia is gaining popularity and needs to address hardware bottlenecks. With high capacity SD cards becoming more widespread and the new UFS card gaining support, the memory market is looking pretty sweet.

Share:
  • TwitThis
  • StumbleUpon
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • NewsVine
  • E-mail this story to a friend!

Linux to frag smartphone OS competition for next five years

Comments

A recent ABI Research report is forecasting huge progress for Linux as the OS of choice for smartphones, claiming 31% of smartphones will be running it by 2012 thanks to a compound annual growth rate of 74%. Both Nokia and Palm have been flirting with Linux adoption for awhile. In fact, being more of an open product was one of the key changes Palm needed to embrace, according to a certain open letter. The report just goes to show that doing so early will get them on board with developers. Now, the BlackBerry’s fairly closed in terms of its OS and odds are it’s going to stay that way. How much of a lead could open source adoption give Palm over RIM?

Share:
  • TwitThis
  • StumbleUpon
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • NewsVine
  • E-mail this story to a friend!

Analyst says BlackBerry 8820 will have SIP support

Comments

ABIAfter listening in on ABI Research’s recent talk on fixed-mobile convergence, analyst Stuart Carlaw has speculated that RIM will be providing SIP support in addition to its already-established UMA for the BlackBerry 8820. There was some concern earlier that the voice hand-off technology that the BlackBerry 8820 was touting (UMA) wouldn’t be compatible with the enterprise standard (SIP). ABI said that ever since acquiring Cingular, AT&T has been drifting towards SIP and similarly, RIM’s acquisition of Ascendent should facilitate PBX integration through SIP.

If AT&T’s release of the BlackBerry 8820 really is just around the corner, we’ll be finding out what it’s packing soon enough. Stuart also set UMA and SIP in a consumer versus enterprise light. If future Wi-Fi enabled BlackBerrys don’t work with both UMA and SIP, at very least we can hope that consumer-oriented products like the BlackBerry 8320 are packing UMA, and business-end products like the 8820 will be kicking SIP (even if it should have been there in the first place).

Share:
  • TwitThis
  • StumbleUpon
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • NewsVine
  • E-mail this story to a friend!

Video messaging to bring in $17 billion by 2012

Comment

The upcoming BlackBerry OS might be packing streaming video support, but the real moneymaking could be in video messaging. A recent report from ABI Research forecasts $17 billion in revenues from video messaging and telephony services by 2012. RIM’s still getting their feet wet in multimedia devices, and to be honest, video messaging seems a long way off. Incoming video streaming is a good start, but not only will the camera hardware have to evolve, but a network which reliably supports the data stream will also be necessary for outbound video messaging to happen. Even then, data-intensive activity like that isn’t exactly RIM’s style. The consumer angle for mobile video support is obvious (who doesn’t want a webcam on their phone?), but could video conferencing functionality make a camera more of a business-oriented feature on a BlackBerry?

Press release behind the jump

Share:
  • TwitThis
  • StumbleUpon
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • NewsVine
  • E-mail this story to a friend!