Tag: demographics

Study reveals wireless-only households finally exceed landline

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Death of the land line

It will be only a matter of time until the landline has become completely obsolete and nowhere to be found. Mobile phones, and BlackBerry devices in particular, offer a level of communication that the landline simply can’t compete with. Households are switching to mobile entirely and do not feel the need to have a landline anymore.

Around 20% of U.S. households have given up their landlines in favor of cell phones. Wireless-only households increased by 17% from the first six months of 2008 to the second half of the year — the largest jump since the National Center for Health Statistics started collecting data in 2003. For the first time, the percentage of wireless-only households exceeds the percentage that rely on landline telephones alone.

For the period July through December 2008:

  • More than three in five adults living only with unrelated adult roommates (60.6%) were in households with only wireless telephones. This is the highest prevalence rate among the population subgroups examined.
  • Nearly two in five adults renting their home (39.2%) had only wireless telephones. Adults renting their home were more likely than adults owning their home (9.9%) to be living in households with only wireless telephones.
  • More than two in five adults aged 25-29 years (41.5%) lived in households with only wireless telephones. Approximately one-third (33.1%) of adults aged 18-24 years lived in households with only wireless telephones.
  • As age increased from 30 years, the percentage of adults living in households with only wireless telephones decreased: 21.6% for adults aged 30-44 years; 11.6% for adults aged 45-64 years; and 3.3% for adults aged 65 years and over.
  • Men (20.0%) were more likely than women (17.0%) to be living in households with only wireless telephones.
  • Adults living in poverty (30.9%) and adults living near poverty (23.8%) were more likely than higher income adults (16.0%) to be living in households with only wireless telephones.
  • Adults living in the South (21.3%) and Midwest (20.8%) were more likely than adults living in the Northeast (11.4%) or West (17.2%) to be living in households with only wireless telephones.
  • Non-Hispanic white adults (16.6%) were less likely than Hispanic adults (25.0%) or non-Hispanic black adults (21.4%) to be living in households with only wireless telephones.

See the full study by the National Center for Health Statistics.