Tag: litigation

Saxon files lawsuit against RIM for alleged patent infringement

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The famous line here is “if you can’t innovate, litigate.” Saxon, a tiny company of only 5 employees, bought a series of patents back in 2007 from AMD. These patents are the grounds for their current lawsuit against RIM and a host of other device manufacturers. The company is trying to shut down US imports until they are compensated for the alleged breach of patents.

According to InfoWorld these patents are:

* A keypad monitor patent was granted in August 1993
* Interrupt marks patent was granted in June 1996
* Mailbox patent was granted in March 1997

[Via]

Wi-LAN and RIM settle patent dispute

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You might remember Ottawa-based Wi-LAN recently putting the legal screws to RIM over some CDMA and Wi-Fi patents in late June. Well, the dispute has mysteriously drawn to a close, but considering Wi-LAN is saying their financial results will be better this year because of the case’s turnout, it’s probably safe to say RIM settled with them and licensed the patents. Can’t win ‘em all, eh? When we first reported on the issue, a lot of people defended the company when called a “patent troll“. GeorgeD made a very good point…

The fact of the matter is that patent violations are part of the cost of doing business, only the big companies have largely gotten used to ignoring those who can’t afford to take them on, or otherwise buying them outright.

What do you guys think - do folks in the patent business get an unfairly bad rap around these parts? What differentiates a “patent troll” from more legitimate patent work?

(via Yahoo!)

RIM sued alongside Apple and Palm

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GavelWiAV Solutions has recently unloaded both barrels of legal action on RIM, Apple and Palm regarding what’s called Adaptive Multi-Rate compression, a GSM voice compression technology. AMR is used to detect silence rather than sound, altering music to accommodate voice, and power management. Up to ten patents are supposedly being infringed upon, but AMR was included in the GSM standard back in ‘98, so you have to wonder how it will all end up. WiAV only actually owns two of the offending patents, while they’re dragging their liscensor, Mindspeed, into the case to defend the rest of the technologies. On the whole, it sounds like this is a shaky case already, and probably won’t get too far. If you’re fluent in legalese, you can take a look at some of the court papers here.

(via Engadget)

Sprint gets nailed for $73 million in illegal ETFs

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Phoenix Wright dude j\'accuse-ing

The latest in Sprint’s downward spiral to oblivion is the conclusion of a class-action lawsuit which ruled that contract early termination fees did not count as rates, and therefor fell under federal, rather than California state law. Using such ETFs as a means to discourage jumping ship is illegal under federal law, and so $18.23 million was rewarded to those who were forced to pay up. On top of that, they’ve got $54.75 million in unpaid ETFs that will be recredited. Ow. Tough break there, Sprint. Some appeals are likely to happen, but things aren’t looking so hot right now.

(via Kansas City Business Journal)

Shady European ringtone dealers to be investigated

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Ringtones are without a doubt one of the most popular mobile markets out there, and apparently a healthy chunk of them aren’t playing by the rules. The European Union has looked at over 500 websites and found that 80% garnered investigation in regards to misleading charges, secret contract agreements, and misusing the word “free”. There’s an FAQ detailing how the EU is going to continue the process, and they’ve already posted a list of many retailers who have been flagged, so before you buy any ringtones, be sure to make sure they’re legit, and for your own sake, read the fine print. In the end, you could just use cellsea to convert your own ringtones…

(via cellular-news)

GSM gateway vendor to sue T-Mobile?

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Once upon a time, VIP Communications sold GSM gateways. These magical gateways enabled extra-cheap calling by shunting the calls over the cell network, and saved the poor landline callers precious pennies and nickels every day. That’s when the big bad magenta monster, T-Mobile, came along and stomped VIP Communications into a legal pulp for overloading the wireless network in the areas around the gateways. VIP crawled away wounded and went to sell cheap cell time to enterprise through other means, but was still bitter about the situation.

One day when frolicking in the woods and gathering minutes, VIP Communications found a report…

Visto bites back in patent battle

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Although Visto has coughed up the dough to RIM for some patent infringement already, the U.S. Patent Office has validated a whooping 21 patent claims prior to the next round of legalities. RIM had countersued Visto after some initial litigations, which are set to resume following RIM’s win earlier this summer. The patents in question surround e-mail synchronization between handsets and local servers - clearly something Visto has a stake in, and obviously a technology vital to the continued operation of BlackBerrys. Looks like Visto’s down but far from out…

Wi-LAN sues RIM over tranceiver patents

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GavelOttawa-based company Wi-LAN just opened up a can of legal whoop-ass, dishing out healthy servings to not only RIM but Motorola and UTStarcom. Wi-LAN has patents relating to both CDMA and Wi-Fi, and the ones they’re claiming infringement on are “MultiCode Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum” and “Method and apparatus for multiple access between transceivers in wireless communications using OFDM spread spectrum“. Bit of a mouthful, eh? The two both deal with transcievers and how they decode information, which goes to show how RIM, Motorola and any other manufacturers make for juicy targets for Wi-LAN. As if these guys actually have a “Litigation Update” widget on their site…

RIM’s patent lawyers charge too much

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CashmoneyAfter winding down from the UK win against Visto, a High Court judge has deemed the £5.18m bill from RIM’s lawyers far too high. “For these sums of money, one would be entitled to expect each of them to be able to recite all the documents in the case by heart,” said Justice Floyd. Allen & Overy handled the case, rebuking “The reality is that the legal costs were a tiny fraction of the value of RIM’s business, which was put at risk through this litigation. A&O’s efforts also benefited RIM and the industry by removing Visto’s ability to pursue disproportionate financial gain from the patent.” This actually worked out in Visto’s favour, as they were ordered to pay two thirds of RIM’s reduced legal costs, which totalled £1.6m.

TCS and RIM reach legal stalemate

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GavelTeleCommunication Systems filed a patent lawsuit against RIM back in December over the use of some e-mail technologies, but so far proceedings are going nowhere. As a result, they’re calling it quits for now while both parties reassess their strategies. Round 2 should get going around June 12th., after which point we’ll see if TCS actually has a leg to stand on.




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