Tag: NFC

Monilink offers BlackBerry banking app

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Banking via mobile sites can take a long time over EDGE networks, but anyone in the UK can now enjoy Monetise’s newest application, Monilink. Many major banks like Natwest and HSBC are already signed on, with many more on the way. Soon they’ll be able to send out text alerts when your bank balance getting dangerously low - certainly a healthy reminder to have for the big spenders out there. A service that British ATMs already offer is mobile top-ups, which Monilink will also provide. Prepaid BlackBerrys might not be popular, but they’re out there and could stand to benefit. Sound promising? There’s more on the way.

“Monitise expects to announce the availability of its services in other territories across the world, as well as the introduction of a range of new services, including inter-account transfers, peer to peer payments, bill settlement, international remittances and contactless (Near Field Communication) payments.”

(via Finextra)

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Taiwan trials SIM-based NFC

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Gemalto and Far EasTone Telecommunications are tag-teaming a new initiative to bring SIM card-based near-field communication services to Taiwan, starting with a trial phase and eventually leading to a full roll-out in ‘08. NFC allows for contactless transactions, so you just wave your phone in front of a sensor, which debits your account and sets you up with whatever service you were looking for. Here’s an example.

Taiwan’s hypermarket chain, Far Eastern Geant for instance, will hang posters embedded with NFC tags at their stores. Shoppers walk by, wave their NFC mobile across the poster and walk away with a coupon downloaded to the SIM for use at the checkout or for later purchases. Moreover, subscribers can view and interact with services provisioned using the mobile’s own web browser.

Embedding this function in SIM cards allows users to swap devices without any disruption in service, and lets mobile operators introduce new services through it, such as topping up your minutes at a terminal. NFC is becoming a growing market, and getting the technology inside a SIM card could significantly increase adoption.

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Weekly Contest: What’s after Wi-Fi and GPS?

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Question MarkThe BlackBerry 8820’s been making the European rounds by now, and the BlackBerry 8310 will be spreading its GPS love to the consumer market soon enough. GPS is still a far cry from being widespread in handhelds, and it will be some time before it’s as common as camera and music in phones. But for conversation’s sake, let’s say that by the end of 2008 Wi-Fi and GPS will become a common feature in any BlackBerry that comes out. For this week’s Weekly Contest, we ask you dear reader: what’s after Wi-Fi and GPS? Is it simply a matter of expanding their capabilities? Is 3G the next big feature to drop? How about near-field technology? A recent ABI report seems to think so. Maybe WiBree? Whoever can best tap their inner techno-voodoo and see into the future will win 3 games from Bplay.

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Analysts predict wireless debit to make it big

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Maybe you’ve heard of near-field communication, or NFC? It’s a technology that’s been in development for awhile that, once the hardware’s been integrated into a mobile device, you just bring two within a few centimeters of one another and you’ve made a connection. This could make for quick Wi-Fi or Bluetooth pairings, but the biggest selling point for NFC has been for monetary transactions, and Juniper Research thinks that $22 billion will have passed through NFC-based transactions like European mPayments by 2009. It’s still a ways off from making a big splash on North American shores, but it’s a cool possibility. Who here would feel comfortable with their BlackBerry doubling as their credit card? I think if there was adequate support both by handheld manufacturers as well as commercial venues, NFC could become very popular very quickly.

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