Tag: qualcomm

New Qualcomm technology could mean 1.3GHz BlackBerry

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rim blackberry storm teardown

Qualcomm has recently developed a 1.3GHz CPU that is intended for the mobile space. The CPU comes with an upgrade to the Snapdragon line of mobile processors. The QSD8650A jumps from the previous 1GHz to a new 1.3GHz but is also Qualcomm’s first 45 nanometer processor; it’s about 30 percent faster than its predecessor but simultaneously uses 30 percent less average power than earlier parts. Video performance in 3D and elsewhere has also been given a boost, the company says.

So what could this mean for BlackBerry? Well as you know, Qualcomm provides the chipset for CDMA BlackBerry devices. Currently, Qualcomm is powering the BlackBerry Storm with a an MSM7600 CPU. Hopefully, Qualcomm will take its latest 1.3GHz CPU and license it to RIM for future devices.

The chip provides support for 3G over either CDMA or UMTS networks as well as Bluetooth, GPS and Wi-Fi. It can likewise support displays as large as WXGA (usually 1366×768) as well as TV tuning through formats like FLO TV in the US or DVB-H in Europe. In spite of its high clock speed, the new Snapdragon is efficient enough for smartphones and uses less than 10 mW of power at idle.

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Qualcomm enters BlackBerry storefront market with Plaza Retail

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With the launch of App Word and existing carrier sales portals, one would tend to think subscribers aren’t in need of another content distribution method for BlackBerry. Qualcomm would disagree and they’re launching an expansion of their Plaza suite of solutions to include Plaza Retail.

Plaza Retail consists of three elements:

* Management Center - A content merchandizing system that will support Java, BREW, Flash and BlackBerry with planned support for Android, Windows Mobile, Palm, Symbian and LiMo. Management Center allows for managing pricing, licensing, packaging, promotions, placement, segmentation, personalization, delivery and analytics in a unified manner across multiple platforms.
* Storefront - A multi-platform client, Web, or mobile Web (WAP) storefront built on Web standards and a storefront management portal that enables retailers to easily update their store layout, promotions and micro-stores, thereby enhancing merchandising effectiveness and driving a common branding and user experience across their entire device lineup.

[Via]

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Broadcom moves forward with antitrust case against Qualcomm

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Gavel The ongoing spat between chip manufacturers Qualcomm and Broadcom continues this week, but Qualcomm’s managed to stem the tide of litigations a fair bit. A US Court of Appeals has ruled that two out of Broadcom’s eight initial charges would be able to proceed in court, even though the whole thing was put to bed in August 2006 by a District Court. The dismissed charges involved CDMA chips and Qualcomm’s acquisition of OFDM/OFDMA developer Flarion. Broadcom has already locked down a chip ban, but Qualcomm still has some fight left. We’ll keep you posted on the next move in this bitter grudge match.

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Qualcomm lawyer quits losing battle

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Lou Lupin, Qualcomm’s legal counsel and senior VP must have been putting in some hefty overtime lately. In fact, the increasingly one-sided battle highlighted by yesterday’s ruling that Qualcomm pay Broadcom $39.3 million probably caused him to resign. Qualcomm’s starting to feel its teeth rattle as a result of the battery it’s taken over the last couple of weeks, mainly with Broadcom winning a video compression patent issue and the lack of progress being made on the power management patent front. A recent addition to Qualcomm, Carol Lam, will be taking up the reigns until a full replacement can be found.

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Qualcomm hid patents, foots Broadcom’s legal bill

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Qualcomm takes a second hit today, now with a federal judge ruling that Qualcomm had hidden video compression patents until deciding to sue Broadcom for using them. As a result, Qualcomm had waived its rights to legally protect the patents, and on top of that the judge has ordered them to pay Broadcom’s legal fees. Ouch. Paired up with The Feds giving Qualcomm no mercy, it’s been a rough day for the bearded industry giant.

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Qualcomm gets no love from feds

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GavelQualcomm’s fight against its US chip ban takes a hit, as the Bush administration sticks by the ITC’s decision. Earlier, Qualcomm was really hoping that federal intervention could get them back in the saddle, but it looks like they’ll have to find another way around the issue. The ban is on select power management chips, so they can still do business in the US (heck, they’re the number one chip maker), but this is still a serious blow. While more appeals are likely to follow, sooner or later Qualcomm will run out of authorities to turn to. We’ll keep you posted on what happens next in this ongoing struggle.

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Qualcomm still number 1 chip maker

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With all the legal troubles that Qualcomm has been embroiled in lately, it was a bit of a suprise to still see the big Q at the top of the list of mobile chipset suppliers for Q2 2007 (Qualcomm had overtaken Texas Instruments for the number 1 spot last quarter). Then we remembered that, until things change, Qualcomm is still in every CDMA BlackBerry (as well as pretty much everything else CDMA). Accordingly, analyst iSuppli agreed with us:

“Qualcomm took the top spot on the strength of healthy growth in EvDO and WCDMA baseband chips,” said Francis Sideco, senior analyst, wireless communications, for iSuppli. “This achievement caps a sustained period of gains for Qualcomm.

While this is good news for Qualcomm, it should be noted that Texas Instruments reported a big upswing during its mid-quarter update, possibly related to customer fears over Qualcomm’s future.

Take a look at the Q2 mobile chipset rankings

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Qualcomm CEO not willing to make nice with Broadcom

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During a conference call yesterday discussing his company’s quarterly results, Qualcomm’s CEO, Paul Jacobs, said that the company has been unable to resolve its messy patent dispute with Broadcom because a deal would hurt its licensing business. Jacobs told investors that Broadcom wants its customers to be exempt from paying Qualcomm licensing fees for a large chunk of its intellectual property portfolio as part of a settlement, which Jacobs claimed was unacceptable.

Considering that Qualcomm has lost its last two court cases against Broadcom, this might simply be conference call posturing. However, things get trickier when Verizon’s recent deal with Broadcom is taken into account. Verizon is set to pay Broadcom a licensing fee, Verizon’s CEO said he would seek a way to receive compensation for the payments, which many have taken as an expectation that Qualcomm would end up footing the bill. Sounds crazy, but Verizon is Qualcomm’s largest carrier customer, and while no deal is in place, Qualcomm brass has already made overtures about supporting their “very important customer”.

In no way is this messy story over yet. Keep hitting BBCool and we’ll continue to fill you in with all the juicy details.

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Verizon pays Broadcom for chips, skips Qualcomm

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Sprint and Qualcomm might be getting chummy to slug it through this power management chip ban in the U.S., but Verizon’s going with the other side, and is liscencing Broadcom’s opposing patents for $6 per 1xEVDO device. Broadcom stands to make up to $200 million from the deal, maxing out at $40 million per quarter. With that, it sounds like everybody’s got their tag teams set up and the battle lines are drawn. In the red corner, we’ve got Qualcomm and Sprint, in the blue corner Verizon and Broadcom. Bush has sent an aide to look over the International Trade Comission ban, which could end the fight early if in Qualcomm’s favour, and should have an answer by August 6th.

Full press release behind the jump.

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Sprint and Qualcomm to tag-team Broadcom

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Yesterday’s BlackBerry 8830 release was just as telling as we had thought. Not only is Sprint carrying a Qualcomm processor in the BlackBerry World Edition, but it looks like the two companies will be working together to find an alternative technology in case the ban on certain chips can’t be stayed. If the embargo sticks, then Qualcomm’s future EVDO and WCDMA chips would need some serious reworking to get over the border. As is, some of Qualcomm’s chips are stepping on a Broadcom power management patent, forcing Sprint to use a temporary software patch to keep their devices legal in the U.S.

Sprint product manager Brita Horton said in an interview that the company would be unaffected by the ban and can bring out as many new devices as it wants this year as a result of a software update it received from Qualcomm. “Qualcomm gave us a software patch that … lets us keep shipping,” said Horton, who noted that while the software patch creates extra work for Sprint, it would not increase costs.

That’s nice that they’re trying to put on a nonchalant face, but if the dispute was really a non-issue for Sprint, they wouldn’t have any reason to help Qualcomm out. The reality is, this patch probably just disables the offending functionality, which Sprint would rather keep than scrap.

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