Tag: research

Study shows pizza and entertainment driving mobile purchases

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Billing Revolution and Harris Interactive have some interesting survey data regarding the purchase habits of mobile based consumers. The data shows some significant trends along gender lines, income, education, and even preferences when it comes to specific items like pizza, tickets and entertainment. 

Here’s a snapshot of some survey results:

  • 93% of U.S. adults (93%) own a cell phone, and nearly half of these adults (45%) think it’s at least somewhat safe to make a purchase through their cell phone with 26% saying they think it’s fairly or very safe to do so.
  • Nearly half of cell phone owners (46%) would be willing to make purchases this way.
  • Of those who would be willing to make purchases through their cellphone, (75%) would be willing to buy entertainment items, such as movie/event tickets (58%), music (41%), mobile video or TV content (24%) and games (34%).Many would also purchase food/drink items (68%) such as pizza (59%), fast food (42%), and/or coffee (25%), and over half (55%) would be willing to purchase hotel rooms (43%) and/or tickets for travel (40%) this way.
  • Read the full research data from Billing Revolution and Harris Interactive

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    Study reveals wireless-only households finally exceed landline

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    Death of the land line

    It will be only a matter of time until the landline has become completely obsolete and nowhere to be found. Mobile phones, and BlackBerry devices in particular, offer a level of communication that the landline simply can’t compete with. Households are switching to mobile entirely and do not feel the need to have a landline anymore.

    Around 20% of U.S. households have given up their landlines in favor of cell phones. Wireless-only households increased by 17% from the first six months of 2008 to the second half of the year — the largest jump since the National Center for Health Statistics started collecting data in 2003. For the first time, the percentage of wireless-only households exceeds the percentage that rely on landline telephones alone.

    For the period July through December 2008:

    • More than three in five adults living only with unrelated adult roommates (60.6%) were in households with only wireless telephones. This is the highest prevalence rate among the population subgroups examined.
    • Nearly two in five adults renting their home (39.2%) had only wireless telephones. Adults renting their home were more likely than adults owning their home (9.9%) to be living in households with only wireless telephones.
    • More than two in five adults aged 25-29 years (41.5%) lived in households with only wireless telephones. Approximately one-third (33.1%) of adults aged 18-24 years lived in households with only wireless telephones.
    • As age increased from 30 years, the percentage of adults living in households with only wireless telephones decreased: 21.6% for adults aged 30-44 years; 11.6% for adults aged 45-64 years; and 3.3% for adults aged 65 years and over.
    • Men (20.0%) were more likely than women (17.0%) to be living in households with only wireless telephones.
    • Adults living in poverty (30.9%) and adults living near poverty (23.8%) were more likely than higher income adults (16.0%) to be living in households with only wireless telephones.
    • Adults living in the South (21.3%) and Midwest (20.8%) were more likely than adults living in the Northeast (11.4%) or West (17.2%) to be living in households with only wireless telephones.
    • Non-Hispanic white adults (16.6%) were less likely than Hispanic adults (25.0%) or non-Hispanic black adults (21.4%) to be living in households with only wireless telephones.

    See the full study by the National Center for Health Statistics.

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