Tag: wearables

Sonny Vu, CEO of Misfit Wearables, on the future of wearables #WebSummit

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Misfit Wearables has had some great success in the wearable tech space. Its first product, Shine, is an activity tracker with fashion appeal. The product, according to CEO Sonny Vu, wasn’t even taken seriously by the company until its massive success on Indiegogo. Before they launched the Indiegogo page, Sonny wasn’t entirely sure why people were buying activity trackers and whether or not it was a passing fad. More than $800,000 later, Shine was crowdfunded and on its way to production. This product also kickstarted the company into the wearable industry, and led it to get a much better understanding of the wearable space and where it’s going. This was the focus of Sonny Vu’s talk at Web Summit 2014.

Read the full article at Connectedly.com.

WWTO July 2014: Bionik Laboratories ARKE Exoskeleton, eSight, SENSIMAT & Lynxio

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If you’re in Toronto tomorrow, check out the We Are Wearables event. The theme of tomorrow’s meetup will be the potential of wearable technology to augment our physical capabilities. The companies presenting include Bionik Laboratories (The ARKE Exoskeleton), eSight Eyewear, SENSIMAT, Lynxio and Sensassure.

I wonder if any of these companies will be competing in the 2016 Cybathlon. The Swiss competition will have exoskeleton, powered wheelchair and even brain interface races.

Check out this Meetup link for more details on WWTO tomorrow.

Coming Soon To Indiegogo: LEO, An Intelligent Fitness Wearable By GestureLogic

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Leonard MacEachern is a professor at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. His company, GestureLogic, is showing off a new wearable that is soon to arrive on Indiegogo.

The wearable, called LEO, is a band of silver-woven fabric that wraps around the user’s thigh and measures hamstring movement, hydration and heart rate. The device is not named after Leonard MacEachern, but rather Leonardo da Vinci, as the man embodies the science behind the product.

The architecture of LEO is very similar to other wearables on the market. The device collects data from the user’s exercise, then syncs that data with a smartphone and the cloud. Where LEO differentiates itself is that the cloud is used to gather data and send recommendations back to the user to help them train more effectively.

Read the full article over at Connectedly.

Thalmic Labs’ Myo Armband And The Long Road To Gaming Accessory

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When I first saw Thalmic Labs’ Myo armband, I thought “that’s a cool device, but why?”. It’s a problem that a lot of wearables and IoT products are experiencing. Sure, it’s cool to track your heartbeat, brain patterns, or watch your dog while you’re away, but is that a solution to a real consumer problem?

Read the full article over at Connectedly.

BlackBerry Missing From Wearables: 2014′s Hottest Consumer Tech Trend

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One of the biggest trends right now in consumer tech and mobile devices is wearables. Whether it’s The Quantified Self or a means of better interacting with your devices, wearables is one of the hottest items in consumer tech right now. But where does BlackBerry fit in? iOS and Android both have very crucial roles in wearables, as most of these devices are integrated into both platforms. BlackBerry seems to be going full enterprise, but one can’t help but notice there is a lot of opportunity for BlackBerry in wearables, but with nothing really going on.
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