Tag: wireless

Zeus Trojan Spotted on BlackBerry Devices in Europe

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BlackBerry has been fortunate enough to be relatively free of these sorts of stories for a long time, but now some relatively isolated reports of a few variants of the Zeus trojan are starting to be seen in the wild in Germany, Spain and Italy.
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Monitor Your Security System Wirelessly with BlackBerry and GotoCamera

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Singapore-based Pechora Technologies has launched their service for BlackBerry that allows users to monitor their security system live from their phone.
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Fixmo Announces Partnership with Veracode

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Today at BlackBerry World, Fixmo announced a partnership with Veracode to integrate their cloud-based application platform into Fixmo’s Sentinel monitoring software.

Sentinel remotely tracks your organization’s mobile devices to make sure they’re remaining in a known and trusted state. Veracode’s cloud-based application platform combined with Fixmo Sentinel software will work to provide enterprise-level device integrity assurance. Sentinel features a dashboard that can do mobile administration, record detailed event logs, can perform instant over-the-air device locks or wipes, and more.

Visit Fixmo.com for more info

RIM Considers Another Bid for Nortel’s Patent Portfolio

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RIM is once again considering acquiring the patents for Nortel’s CDMA and LTE technologies. Control over these patents will help ward off costly and untimely lawsuits that seem to plague every big player in the mobile industry. The patents will also go into developing wireless products and services for the next generation of mobile connectivity.

The bid will be rivaling that of Google’s $900-million bid on the entire set of set of over 6000 wireless patents. Google has been trying to grow the size of its mobile patent portfolio ever since they acquired Android Inc. in 2005.

RIM has been fighting for these patents for a couple of years now and seems poised to grab a least a small piece of Nortel’s formidable mobile patent portfolio.

Five years of Bluetooth on BlackBerry: Current and Future Implementations

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Back in ’94, Bluetooth was invented and standardized to be a wireless cable replacement technology. After a long battle with adoption and interoperability, Bluetooth is now standard issue in most smartphones, road-ready laptops, and a slew of other devices that connect to them wirelessly. Originally created to replace RS-232 serial cable, Bluetooth is now built into all manners of electronics, over 10,000 product lines in total.

The mobile phone, automotive, computing, and consumer electronic industries have come together to make technology easier and better for everyone. When it was first being pitched, marketers spoke of dreams of the Personal Area Network or PAN. The promises of the PAN was more than a little science-fictiony, with fantasies of doors opening like Star Trek and house keys being obsolete.

The first Bluetooth-enabled phone launched a decade ago. RIM’s first Bluetooth-enabled device was the now-famous BlackBerry 7290, which curiously enough came in blue.

This is how the Personal Area Network is shaping up for BlackBerry users five years after RIM started supporting Bluetooth.
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Free BlackBerry application pinpoints cell towers

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The beta for Signal-Location Utilities just came out recently, and looks extremely useful for wireless professionals. By plugging into BlackBerry Maps, you can find tower locations, signal strength, available services, and tower IDs. Easily save tower locations and export them as CSV files or into Google Maps on your desktop. Handheld Google Maps integration is in the works, but everything is still in beta, so be warned. Although it’s a bit of a technical utility that might not be especially useful for most people, anyone working with carriers trying to map out their coverage area could definitely use this to get a good idea of what’s up. Customers in low-coverage areas might also find it helpful to figure out where to go for the best signal. Don’t worry if you don’t have internal GPS – Bluetooth-connected GPS is also supported. Go ahead and give Signal-Location Utilities a shot!

(via BlackBerry Forums)